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Disability Support Services

Learn more about Disability Support Services | View General Education Resources

DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services
450 H ST NW, Washington, DC 20001
202-576-8175 (voice)
dyrs@dc.gov

DC’s cabinet-level juvenile justice agency, administering detention, commitment, and after-care services for youth held under its care in its facilities or residing in the DC community.

DC Department on Disability Services
250 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024
202-730-1700 (voice) | (202) 730-1843 (fax) | (202) 730-1516 (TTY)
dds@dc.gov

The DC Department on Disability Services (DDS) provides the residents of DC with information, oversight, and coordination of services for people with disabilities and those who support them, such as service providers and employers. DDS has two Administrations ( Rehabilitation Services Administration & Developmental Disabilities Administration ) that oversee and coordinate services for residents with disabilities through a network of private and non-profit providers.

REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) - focuses on employment, ensuring that persons with disabilities achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and sustaining employment, economic self-sufficiency and independence. RSA’s program is designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, and informed choice, in order to prepare for and engage in gainful employment 34 C.F.R. § 361.1

  • The RSA Youth in Transition Services Units provide transition services, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 amended, to coordinate a set of activities for students designed around an outcome-oriented process that supports their movement from school to post-school activities including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, and independent living. Vocational rehabilitation transition services link students with disabilities, while still in school, with the vocational rehabilitation program to create a continuum of services leading to long-term employment outcomes for eligible students.
  • To learn more about RSA’s vocational rehabilitation process for youth with disabilities, refer to the RSA Youth in Transition Toolkit: “Explore the World of Work, Discover Your Career”. It provides the specific steps and activities that youth, schools, and parents need to understand to apply for services and work through the RSA process to receive services and find employment.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ADMINISTRATION (DDA) - public agency responsible for the oversight and coordination of all services and supports provided to qualified persons with intellectual disabilities in the District of Columbia.

  • DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

DC Department of Behavioral Health
609 H Street NE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20002
202-673-2200 (voice) | (202) 673-3433 fax | 202-673-7500 (TTY)
dmh@dc.gov

The Department of Behavioral Health's goal is to deliver mental health services that promote a patient's full recovery, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and are choice-driven. The Mental Health Rehabilitation Services (MHRS) system for community-based care offers: evaluation and or screening services, case management, counseling, intensive day treatment, crisis or emergency services, rehabilitation programs, psychiatric treatment, and specialized mental health services.

College Living Experience
(800) 486-5058 (voice)

College Living Experience (CLE) provides individualized post-secondary academic, career, independent living, and social supports to students with autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, and other varying exceptionalities.

Family Voices
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC
(202) 265-1432 (voice)

Family Voices is a national organization working in collaboration with various local organizations on behalf of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) . Family Voices provides parents of children with chronic conditions access to specialty healthcare resources and to other families.

NOTE: Family Voices and the Family-to-Family Health Information Center are separate programs. The latter is grant funded under various Family Voices affiliates.

Abilities Network
10230 New Hampshire Avenue, Suite 300, Silver Spring, MD 20903
301.431.7740 (voice) | 301.431.7742 (fax) | 711 (TTY)

Provides customized services to children, adults and families of differing abilities that focus on one-on-one supports to foster broadened, more inclusive communities through education, training, and advocacy.

ADDitude Magazine

ADDitude Magazine provides readers with information about:

  • Adult ADHD
  • Parenting ADHD children
  • ADHD treatment
  • School & learning disabilities
  • ADHD symptoms & diagnosis
  • Finding resources

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - DC Parent Information Network
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Under a grant from the D.C. Department of Health’s (DOH), Community Health Administration (CHA), AJE is to develop and implement a District of Columbia Parent Information Network (DC PIN). DC PIN is to provide area residents with special health care needs information on family navigation; care coordination; community education; and individual advocacy.  DC PIN will serve all families and children ages 0 to 21 within the District of Columbia.

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - Parent to Parent Program
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Our Parent-to-Parent Program was created to provide parents with a supportive network of peers. This program offers parents an opportunity to develop leadership skills and offer parents in similar situations with support. Peer supporters are provided a comprehensive six-week training that focuses on educational advocacy, the laws supporting special education and related services, and leadership training.

American Association of People with Disabilities
2013 H Street, NW, 5th Floor, Washington , DC 20006
202-457-0046 (voice) | 866-536-4461(fax)

The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation's largest disability rights organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.

American University, Disability Support Services
4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20016
202-885-1000 (voice)

The mission of Disability Support Services (DSS) is to ensure that students with physical, medical, or psychological disabilities have equal access to university programs and services. DSS provides or coordinates a range of services and accommodations that meet the individual needs of a student based on the impact of the specific disability. Please note that students with learning disabilities or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder should contact the Academic Support Center at 202-885-3360 or asc@american.edu.

Capitol College
11301 Springfield Road, Laurel, MD 20708
301-369-2800 (voice)

The mission of Capitol College is to provide practical education in engineering, computer science, information technology and business that prepares individuals for professional careers and affords them the opportunity to thrive in a changing world.

The Catholic University of America, Disability Support Services
620 Michigan Ave NE, 207 Pryzbyla Center, Washington, DC 20064
202-319-5211 (voice) | 202-319-5126 (fax)

Answers questions concerning accommodations and services available and provides information about and give referrals to admissions, registration, financial aid, and other services within the university. DSS can help assess needs in such areas as housing accommodations, attendants, interpreters, readers, transportation, classroom and course accommodations, tutors, notetakers, and adaptive equipment.

Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind
1825 K St, NW, Suite 1103, Washington, DC 20006
202-454-6400 (voice) | 202-454-6401 (fax)

Helps the blind or visually impaired population of the greater Washington region overcome the challenges of vision loss, enabling them to remain independent, active, and productive. Programs and services include training and consultation in assistive technology, employment marketing skills training, career placement services, comprehensive low-vision care, and a wide range of counseling and rehabilitation services.

DC Developmental Disabilities Council
441 4th Street, NW, 729 North, Washington, DC 20001

The Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) helps to empower individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities by:

  • Educating them about local disability rights laws
  • Creating and supporting inclusive health, education, employment, housing, recreation, childcare, and quality assurance programs
  • Connecting them with other community and governmental organizations that provide disability support services

DC Public Library Adaptive Services Division
Room 215, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library 901 G St. NW, Washington, DC 20001
202-727-2142 (voice) | 202-559-5368 (video)
lbph.dcpl@dc.gov

The DC Public Library's Adaptive Services Division assists individuals with limited mobility, visual or hearing impairments. Some of the adaptive services provided by the library include:

  • Narrated DVDs and videos
  • Downloadable books and magazines
  • Instructional sign language materials and information on community resources for the hearing impaired
  • Free assistive technology training

DC Shares
1301 Belmont St, NW, Suite 1D, Washington, DC 20009
202-332-2595 (voice) | 202-332-2597 (fax) | (202) 332-2596 (TTY)
dcshares@verizon.net

DC Shares the place where you can donate gently used durable medical equipment. DC Shares cannot provide services without donations. If you have medical equipment going unused please consider donating it to DC Shares. DC Shares serves low income District residents with disabilities who are unable to get the durable medical equipment they need. Since 2007 DC Shares has been a place where those with disabilities can come to get the Durable Medical Equipment and Assistive Technology Devices that will enable them to live independently. DC Shares provides electric wheelchairs, manual wheelchairs, walkers, canes, shower benches and other durable medical equipment free of charge to those who are uninsured, underinsured, or have no other means of obtaining these devices.

DC Special Education Co-operative
1488 Newton Street, NW #2, Washington , DC 20010
202.232.2288 (voice) | 202.450.3571 (fax)
info@specialedcoop.org

The DC Special Education Co-operative facilitates the development of high -quality, compliant special education programs. These programs promote disability awareness, literacy, and increased accountability among local education agencies (LEAs). The Co-op also provides various support services, including:

  • Program or curriculum consultation
  • Workforce development training
  • Medicaid funding application assistance

DCPS Choose Your Future Website

DCPS’ transition planning website to help you find your best path, customized to what you want. Please explore the information on these pages and talk to your Placement Specialist to start making initial plans, or just to sit down and talk. Your Placement Specialist is available to answer questions, provide more information, and help you figure out how you want your future to look.

DCPS Office of Special Education
1200 First St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202 442 4800 (voice) | 202-442-5517/5518 (fax)

Works with schools to ensure that students with disabilities have the services and support they need to achieve success.

Gallaudet University, Office for Students with Disabilities
Jordan Student Academic Center, Rm 1220, 800 Florida Ave, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-651-5256 (voice) | 202-651-5887 (fax)
oswd@gallaudet.edu

The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSWD) provides individually tailored, comprehensive, support services and programs for students with disabilities. OSWD empowers eligible students to succeed in their pursuit of higher education by striving to assure equal access and opportunity to curricular and extra-curricular activities. Supporting the ideal of life-long learning, OSWD encourages and provides experiences and opportunities to build confidence beyond the classroom. Student autonomy is encouraged through the provision of reasonable accommodations, academic support groups, self-advocacy, and compensatory training. OSWD employs a student-centered interactive model in which collaboration among professionals and OSWD students results in a nondiscriminatory academic environment. In addition, OSWD provides professional development services and programs for faculty and staff and for community-based professionals.

George Mason University, Office of Disability Support
Student Union Bldg I, Rm 211, MSN 5C9, 4400 University Dr, Fairfax, VA 22030
703-993-2474 (voice) | 703-993-4306 (fax) | 703-993-2476 (TTY)

The Office of Disability Services at George Mason University offers a variety of services for students with documented disabilities, including learning disabilities, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/low vision, mobility limitations, attention deficit disorders (ADD/ ADHD), psychiatric disorders, and medical disabilities. We encourage both prospective and current students to learn more about our services by going to our web site at and/or calling our office to make an appointment with an ODS coordinator.

George Washington University, Disability Support Services
Marvin Center, Suite 242, 800 21st St, NW, Washington, DC 20052
202-994-8250 (voice) | 202-994-7610 (fax)
dss@gwu.edu

The George Washington University believes in the equality of people, the value of individual differences, and the unending possibilities for growth and the development of the human spirit. With that philosophy, the University established Disability Support Services (DSS) in 1978 to support students with disabilities so that they may participate fully in university life, derive the greatest benefit from their educational experiences, and achieve maximum personal success. DSS currently serves over 700 GW students with a wide variety of disabilities, as well as those temporarily disabled by injury or illness.

Georgetown University, Academic Resource Center
Leavey Center, Suite 335, Box 571235 , Washington, DC 20057
202-687-8354 (voice)
arc@georgetown.edu

Georgetown University is committed to providing academic support for all students and to integrating students with disabilities as fully as possible into all aspects of University life. The Academic Resource Center fulfills this mission by providing assistance in study skills necessary for academic achievement through individual consultations or workshops; accommodations to students with disabilities under the ADA and Section 504; facilities and support services to help ensure access for students with disabilities.

HEATH Resource Center
2134 G Street, N.W., Suite 306 , Washington , DC 20052
AskHEATH@gwu.edu

The HEATH Resource Center gathers and provides information about national, post-secondary education supports for individuals with disabilities. The Center:

  • Participates in national conferences, trainings, and workshops
  • Develops training modules
  • Publishes resource papers, factsheets, guides, directories, and website information on accessibility, accommodations, financial aid, career development, independent living, and rehabilitation
  • Fosters a network of disability professionals

The HEATH Resource Center is managed by George Washington University's Graduate School of Education and Human Development in partnership with the HSC Foundation and the National Youth Transitions Center.

Howard University, Special Student Services
Howard Center, Suite 725, 2225 Georgia Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20059
202-238-2420 (voice)

All students attending the Howard University with a documented disabilities are eligible and encouraged to register for services.

The Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center Family-Centered Search Tool

The Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center hosts and links to numerous resources relevant to families across the country at its website. The family-centered search feature allows users to filter resources by topic, format, audience, and grade.

M&L Special Needs Resources Webpage
5603 Potomac Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016
855.344.9771 (voice) | 855.344.9771
info@specialneedsplanning.net

At M&L Special Needs Planning, we feel that access to the right information is the key to planning a successful future. In keeping with our goal to keep you informed, and to provide you with the tools to enable you to plan a happy and successful future for your family, we have compiled a list of special needs resources.

Organizations: This special needs resource link will take you to a list of organizations that are dedicated to providing special needs services to your family and your child with special needs. The list includes organizations from all across the country.

Advocacy: Advocacy is a public process by an individual or group which attempts to influence governmental policy and resource allocations. We have compiled a list of advocacy groups that can help you fight for issues that are pertinent to you and your family.

Government and Social Security: A key aspect of our special needs planning services involves working with governmental agencies in order to access public resources. We have provided you with the websites for a number of agencies that you may need to contact in order to receive information or benefits that are important to your family’s future.

Housing: There are a number of organizations which provide information and services related to housing issues and questions. These special needs resources are excellent starting points for understanding housing services.

Disability: This link will take you to a list of websites which contain a wealth of information related to disability, including the link to disability.gov, a redesigned federal website that connects more than 50 million Americans with disabilities to thousands of resources on disability related issues, programs and services.

Local ARCS: The ARC is the world’s largest community-based organization of and for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This link will take you to the websites of the ARC chapters located in Washington D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. The ARCs are located in every state and are an excellent special needs resource for the family with special needs.

Post-Secondary Options: Many parents of children with special needs worry about what their child will do after high school. We have compiled a list of programs and special needs resources to help you access information and begin to plan for this transition in your child’s life.

Health: This list of websites will help you access information regarding medical insurance, medication control, as well as other health related issues.

Transitioning: The transition from school into adulthood is an essential and often complex step in the life of a person with special needs. These special needs resources will provide you with information and access to service providers who can help you and your child with special needs on his or her transitioning journey.

Employment: This section is geared towards employment resources for adults with special needs. There is a number of organization which compile information on this topic. We will add only the best special needs resources to this category.

Magazines and Articles: We have a gathered a number of really fantastic magazines and articles that can provide you with expert information, other special needs resources, and can provide links to other members of the special needs community.

General Assistance: These resources are designed to help with any overall questions, or to provide general information or help on a wide range of topics.

Children with Special Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special needs, the emotional process of the first diagnosis, and the important of early intervention. Early intervention services for both the Washington D.C. area, and nationwide are provided at the end of the article.

Children with Healthcare Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special healthcare needs, how it can impact the family situation, and statistics regarding children with special healthcare needs from across America. Resources to help you find help in obtaining a diagnosis, healthcare, and support are provided.

Special Education Schools: When it comes to helping children with special needs realize their fullest potential, special education schools are a valuable asset. Follow this link for a brief article outlining exactly why special needs schools are so important, and the ways in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 affects the way we educate our children with special needs.

Special Need Trust: A Special Needs Trust is the only legal solution to protect an individual with disabilities to qualify for government benefits. Follow this link for a brief explanation of what the term means and the different types of Special Needs Trusts, as well as other important points to consider when setting up your own Special Needs Trust.

Maryland Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs Resource Locator: In order to improve access to information about needed services and resources, Maryland’s Office for Genetics and People with Special Health Care Needs created the resource database. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) of Maryland created the online resource database for children and youth with special health care needs. In Maryland, over one third of families of these children report that they cannot easily access needed community based services and half of the same families report that they need help finding services for their youngsters. For families in rural areas of the state, it can be even more difficult to find specialty services.

Cerebral Palsy Guide is a website that is intended to give parents of children with cerebral palsy simple, straightforward information about cerebral palsy and its treatment, as well as to help families connect with medical and legal professionals. Designed specifically with parents of children newly diagnosed with CP in mind, the website strives to offer “peace, healing, and happiness.”

Martin Luther King Memorial Library Center for Accessibility (formerly Adaptive Services)
901 G St, NW, Room 215, Washington, DC 20001
202-727-2142 (voice) | 202-727-1129
lbph.dcpl@dc.gov

The Adaptive Services Division offers services to children, youth and adults of all abilities. DC Regional Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped serves eligible blind, visually impaired, deaf-blind, reading-disabled, and those with physical disabilities which prevent them from reading or holding normal printed materials. Service is by mail, free of cost to the library customer. Materials include Braille, print/Braille, downloadable WebBraille and human-voice audio formats. Through the BARD (Braille and Audio Reading Download) service, Talking Books and magazines are available. Programs include monthly Talking Book Club for adults, Braille Book Club for Kids grades 1-6, and other programs. Library Services for the Deaf Community offers free public American Sign Language classes and deaf culture programs and book talks. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library has public videophone service for the deaf.

The Mason LIFE Program

The Mason LIFE Program is an innovative post-secondary program for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who desire a university experience in a supportive academic environment. The mission of the Mason LIFE Program is a dual purpose. The first is to provide a supportive academic environment for our students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The second is to supply an apprenticeship for George Mason University students..

Montgomery College, Developmental Education and Workforce Access Program (includes Challenge Program)
51 Mannakee Street, Rockville, MD 20850
240-567-5000 (voice)

This is a custom-tailored learning community program for students with special needs exiting high school. GTP is a two-year, tuition-based, credit-free certificate program. The overall objective is to enable students to transition to greater independent living through functional education, residential, vocational, and life-skills services. The Challenge Program provides unique courses for adults with developmental disabilities to help them function more independently in their homes, at work, and in the community. Of equal importance, students will have the opportunity to increase their social and community awareness by learning at Montgomery College.

Montgomery College, Disability Support Services
Counseling and Advising Bldg, Rm CB122, 51 Mannakee St , Rockville, MD 20850
240-567-5058 (voice) | 240-567-5097 (fax) | 301-294-9672 (TTY)
dss@montgomerycollege.edu

Disability Support Services (DSS) is dedicated to assisting students with disabilities accomplish their personal, scholastic and career goals. We do this by teaching academic and advocacy skills; eliminating the physical, technical and attitudinal barriers that limit opportunities; and promoting an awareness of the experience of persons with disabilities within social, political, and economic constructs.

National Children's Center
6200 Second St, NW, Washington, DC 20011
202-722-2300 (voice) | 202-722-2383 (fax)

Provides comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in DColumbia and Maryland, including early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs.

National Children's Center SE Campus
3400 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC 20032
202-279-4945 (voice)

Provides comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in DColumbia and Maryland, including early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs.

Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center (NAPTAC)
1600 San Pedro Dr.NE , Albuquerque, NM 87110
(888) 499-2070 (voice) | (505) 767-6631(fax)
info@epicsnm.org

NAPTAC is a project within Education for Parents of Indian Children with Special Needs (EPICS) to provide training and technical assistance to Parent Training Information Centers (PTI’s) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRC’s) nationwide on providing effective, culturally responsive services to Native American families of children with disabilities, as well as youth with disabilities. The NAPTAC will also provide differentiated, targeted and intensive technical assistance to parent centers requesting additional support to build their capacity to provide services to Native American parents of children with disabilities, as well as youth with disabilities. The staff and consultants of the NAPTAC are experienced professionals who are ready to provide each Parent Center with high quality services and supports. A Technical Assistance Specialist will be assigned a region as organized by the Regional Parent Technical Assistance Centers (RPTACs). EPICS is a non-profit entity providing training, advocacy and supports to families of Native American children with disabilities and special healthcare needs. EPICS houses the Community Parent Resource Center (CPRC) and the NAPTAC.

New View, LLC
966 Hungerford Dr, Suite 7, Rockville, MD 20850
240-535-4036 (voice)
contact@newviewot.com

New View, LLC establishes relationships with children, young adults, adults, and their families and/or educational support team to determine relevant, individualized, and client-centered recommendations related to education, work, self-care, and leisure. We provide quality therapeutic services across the lifespan to create meaningful life experiences that help to improve independence and confidence in education, work, self-care, and leisure activities. We provide occupational therapy treatment and evaluation in addition to vocational, career guidance, and assessment.

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
5335 Wisconsin AVE NW Suite 825, Washington, DC 20015
(202) 448-1450  (voice)
info@dcqualitytrust.org

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities is an advocacy organization that is an independent catalyst for change in the lives of people of all ages with developmental disabilities. Quality Trust advocates, monitors, provides legal education, training, and family navigation to residents of the District of Columbia.

Seeds of Tomorrow
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Suite M1, Washington, DC 20020
202-747-7530 (voice) | 1-866-338-1588 (fax)

A transitional school that offers academic remediation, life skills classes, and a summer program. . Job coaches, therapists, and teachers are available to work on social skills in the workplace and to supervise job experiences for resume building.

Sharpe Health School
4300 13th St, NW, Washington, DC 20011
202-576-6161 (voice)

A DC day school that provides services to students in wheelchairs with cognitive deficits who have complicated medical needs.

Student Veterans of America
1625 K Street NW, Suite 320 , Washington , DC 20006
(202) 223-4710 (voice)

Student Veterans of America envisions a nation where all student veterans succeed in post-secondary programs and contribute to civilian society in meaningful ways. SVA provides the resources and support to do so through five major initiatives. We maintain a commitment to Support Chapters through leadership training, grants, and networking opportunities that facilitate the development of successful student-run organizations. An essential component of chapter work is advocating for supportive campus services and programs. At the national level, SVA’s Advocacy efforts ensure policies are not only supportive for veterans in their transition to school and employment, but also for the entire military community. To best serve this large community, SVA Develops Partnerships with other organizations to provide scholarships, mentorships, employment, and benefits counseling. Yet, our support doesn’t end at graduation. Student Veterans of America is developing a networking program that will Connect Alumni veterans with even more professional opportunities. These initiatives are designed to bring veterans closer to their degrees, yet little data exists on student veterans' academic performance. By Investing in Research, SVA hopes to fill that void and showcase student veteran success.

Students for Disability Awareness, Western Washington University Washington, DC

For youth who might want to attend college

Trinity DC, Disability Student Services
Academic Service Center, Library, 1st,
202-884-9358 (voice)

If you are a student with a psychological, cognitive, and/or physical disability, Disability Student Services (DSS) is here to ensure that you receive support services that will equalize your access for your courses and campus activities. In contrast to high school, where students with disabilities are entitled to certain services, in college, you must become approved or eligible for services based on the guidelines set forth by your college/university (Read "Disability in Higher Education"). At Trinity, this means that you must first register with DSS before you can request support services.

University of Maryland College Park, Disability Support Services
4th Floor, Susquehanna Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
301-314-7682 (voice)

The mission of the Disablility Support Service is to coordinate services that ensure individuals with disabilities equal access to University of Maryland College Park programs.

University of the District of Columbia, Disability Resource Center
4200 Connecticut Ave, NW, Bldg 44, Rm A-39 , Washington, DC 20008
202-274-6417 (voice) | 202-274-5375 (fax) | 202-448-7213 (videophone) (TTY)

The University of the District of Columbia (UDC) is an urban land grant institution. UDC is a comprehensive public institution offering affordable post-secondary degrees at the associates, baccalaureate, and graduate levels. The Disability Supports Services Offices provides accommodations and assistance to students with documented disabilities. It is the student’s responsibility to request accommodations. Students will also need to provide recent documentation of their disability and recent testing and evaluations of their disability.


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