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Supports

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DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services
450 H ST NW, Washington, DC 20001
202-576-8175 (voice)
dyrs@dc.gov

DC’s cabinet-level juvenile justice agency, administering detention, commitment, and after-care services for youth held under its care in its facilities or residing in the DC community.

DC Department on Disability Services
250 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024
202-730-1700 (voice) | (202) 730-1843 (fax) | (202) 730-1516 (TTY)
dds@dc.gov

The DC Department on Disability Services (DDS) provides the residents of DC with information, oversight, and coordination of services for people with disabilities and those who support them, such as service providers and employers. DDS has two Administrations ( Rehabilitation Services Administration & Developmental Disabilities Administration ) that oversee and coordinate services for residents with disabilities through a network of private and non-profit providers.

REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) - focuses on employment, ensuring that persons with disabilities achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and sustaining employment, economic self-sufficiency and independence. RSA’s program is designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, and informed choice, in order to prepare for and engage in gainful employment 34 C.F.R. § 361.1

  • The RSA Youth in Transition Services Units provide transition services, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 amended, to coordinate a set of activities for students designed around an outcome-oriented process that supports their movement from school to post-school activities including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, and independent living. Vocational rehabilitation transition services link students with disabilities, while still in school, with the vocational rehabilitation program to create a continuum of services leading to long-term employment outcomes for eligible students.
  • To learn more about RSA’s vocational rehabilitation process for youth with disabilities, refer to the RSA Youth in Transition Toolkit: “Explore the World of Work, Discover Your Career”. It provides the specific steps and activities that youth, schools, and parents need to understand to apply for services and work through the RSA process to receive services and find employment.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ADMINISTRATION (DDA) - public agency responsible for the oversight and coordination of all services and supports provided to qualified persons with intellectual disabilities in the District of Columbia.

  • DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

DC Department of Behavioral Health
609 H Street NE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20002
202-673-2200 (voice) | (202) 673-3433 fax | 202-673-7500 (TTY)
dmh@dc.gov

The Department of Behavioral Health's goal is to deliver mental health services that promote a patient's full recovery, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and are choice-driven. The Mental Health Rehabilitation Services (MHRS) system for community-based care offers: evaluation and or screening services, case management, counseling, intensive day treatment, crisis or emergency services, rehabilitation programs, psychiatric treatment, and specialized mental health services.

DC Department of Employment Services
4058 Minnesota AVE NE, Washington, DC 20019
202-724-7000 (voice)
does@dc.gov

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) provides a wide variety of services to job seekers through its One-Stop Career Centers. A vocational rehabilitation counselor who works for the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) is also available at the One-Stop Career Centers. Please note that in order to receive services from an Employment Specialist at the One-Stop Career Center, job seekers must complete an assessment that includes a reading test. Residents who test below an eighth grade reading level will be referred to other agencies for assistance.

DC Office on Aging
500 K ST NE, Washington, DC 20002
(202) 727-6603 (voice)
deborah.royster@dc.gov

The DC Office on Aging develops and carries out a comprehensive and coordinated system of health, education, employment, and social services for the District's elderly population, who are 60 years of age and older.  The Office on Aging was created by DC Law 1-24 in 1975 as the District's State and Area Agency on Aging. It is structured to carry out advocacy, leadership, management, program, and fiscal responsibilities. On the program level, the Office on Aging oversees the operation of two on-site programs, the Information and Assistance Center and the Senior Employment and Training Program. In addition, DCOA also provides nursing home care and services to District residents 18 years of age and older. Currently, the DCOA/District owns two nursing facilities that are privately operated and managed. The Washington Center for Aging Services (WCAS), is leased to Stoddard Baptist Home Foundation and Unique Residential Care Facility is leased to Vital Management Team (VMT). It also funds a Senior Service Network comprising 20 community-based nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to the District's elderly citizens.

Adult Literacy Resource Center, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library
901 G St, NW, Rm 300, Washington, DC 20001
202-727-1616 (voice)

The Adult Literacy Resource Center believes that literacy is a right, not a privilege and encourages potential adult learners (ages 16+) to study and provides: High quality adult-oriented books and materials, guidance in choosing materials, access to computers with internet connection, information about adult education programs, referrals to adult education programs: basic reading, GED preparation, English classes, adult night school and the External Diploma Program (another way of getting a high school diploma available at Ballou and Roosevelt Senior High Schools) and GED Practice Test (large print version available).

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - DC Parent Information Network
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Under a grant from the D.C. Department of Health’s (DOH), Community Health Administration (CHA), AJE is to develop and implement a District of Columbia Parent Information Network (DC PIN). DC PIN is to provide area residents with special health care needs information on family navigation; care coordination; community education; and individual advocacy.  DC PIN will serve all families and children ages 0 to 21 within the District of Columbia.

The Arc of the District of Columbia - Beyond High School: Navigating the Future
415 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20017
202-636-2950 (voice)
arcdc@arcdc.net

Our project, funded by a 1-year grant from the Walmart Foundation, will serve 30+ transitioning youth and their families during the '10-'11 school year, with hopes of securing funding to continue the project. Together with our partners, DC Public Schools and Developmental Disabilities Services, we will identify students and families who need assistance planning for their futures and navigating government systems and the many services available to them.

DC Special Education Co-operative
1488 Newton Street, NW #2, Washington , DC 20010
202.232.2288 (voice) | 202.450.3571 (fax)
info@specialedcoop.org

The DC Special Education Co-operative facilitates the development of high -quality, compliant special education programs. These programs promote disability awareness, literacy, and increased accountability among local education agencies (LEAs). The Co-op also provides various support services, including:

  • Program or curriculum consultation
  • Workforce development training
  • Medicaid funding application assistance

Disability.gov

Disability.gov connects people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that support them to important information about:
  • Disability benefits (guides, programs, applications, etc.)
  • Civil rights (ADA information, accessibility guidelines, employment rights, complaint procedures, etc.)
  • Community life (history of the independent living movement, personal care assistance services, sports and leisure activities, etc.)
  • Education (IDEA and IEP information, teaching materials and strategies, classroom supports, college prep, etc.)
  • Emergency preparedness (inclusive emergency planning, disaster recovery assistance, emergency service accessibility, etc.)
  • Employment (career planning, workforce development, internship programs, hiring and recruiting information, etc.)
  • Health care (disability and condition information, services and providers, caregiving options, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Housing (housing laws, home buying guides, supportive housing options, home modification, etc.)
  • Technology (accessible technology guidelines and standards, assistive information technology, assistive educational technology, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Transportation (laws, travel guides, providers, vehicle modification, safety and complaint procedures, etc.)

DMH Access Help Line
1-888-7WE-HELP (voice) | 1 (888) 793-4357 | 202-727-3363 (TTY)

The DMH Access Help Line is the best way to access mental health rehabilitation services and its certified mental health service providers. Mental health professionals staff this 24-hour telephone line. Call the Access Help Line to: Get help with solving problems, share concerns, obtain emergency services, and decide whether to seek mental health or other types of services.

Jenny Hatch Justice Project
202-448-1448 (voice)
JHJP@dcqualitytrust.org

Sponsored by Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, The Jenny Hatch Justice Project (JHJP) supports the right of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities to make decisions about their lives. JHJP provides access to:

  • Recent research publications on independent living services and alternatives to guardianship
  • Informative brochures on decision-making
  • A sample training program
  • Legal, educational, and transition resources

National Children's Center
6200 Second St, NW, Washington, DC 20011
202-722-2300 (voice) | 202-722-2383 (fax)

Provides comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in DColumbia and Maryland, including early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs.

National Children's Center SE Campus
3400 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC 20032
202-279-4945 (voice)

Provides comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in DColumbia and Maryland, including early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs.

Office of Disability Rights Braille Services Interpretation Program
441 4th St, NW, Suite 729N, Washington, DC 20001
odr@dc.gov

It is important that people who are blind or have low vision be able to benefit from DC government services when printed materials are the only means of communication available. District government must provide a mechanism for individuals who are blind or have low vision to request official documents from agencies and to advise them that they need to provide 5-7 business days' notice.

Securing a Future for Your Child with a Disability: A Parents Guide to Adult Services in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, will help you answer the following questions:

  • Who’s in charge of key life decisions.
  • Whether your adult child is eligible for government support.
  • What kind of jobs and day support programs are available.
  • Which recreational activities are best.
  • How he or she will get around.
  • Where they’ll live.

Title VIII: Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

This HUD.gov webpage:

  • Summarizes the purpose and history of the The Fair Housing Act
  • Summarizes HUD's role in administering The Fair Housing Act
  • Highlights significant, recent changes made to the Fair Housing Act
  • Provides an overview of the Fair Housing Assistance Program (FHAP)
  • Specifies regulations for HUD employees and contractors


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