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Benefits

Learn more about Benefits | View General Government Resources

DC Department of Employment Services
4058 Minnesota AVE NE, Washington, DC 20019
202-724-7000 (voice)
does@dc.gov

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) provides a wide variety of services to job seekers through its One-Stop Career Centers. A vocational rehabilitation counselor who works for the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) is also available at the One-Stop Career Centers. Please note that in order to receive services from an Employment Specialist at the One-Stop Career Center, job seekers must complete an assessment that includes a reading test. Residents who test below an eighth grade reading level will be referred to other agencies for assistance.

DC Department on Disability Services
250 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024
202-730-1700 (voice) | (202) 730-1843 (fax) | (202) 730-1516 (TTY)
dds@dc.gov

The DC Department on Disability Services (DDS) provides the residents of DC with information, oversight, and coordination of services for people with disabilities and those who support them, such as service providers and employers. DDS has two Administrations ( Rehabilitation Services Administration & Developmental Disabilities Administration ) that oversee and coordinate services for residents with disabilities through a network of private and non-profit providers.

REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) - focuses on employment, ensuring that persons with disabilities achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and sustaining employment, economic self-sufficiency and independence. RSA’s program is designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, and informed choice, in order to prepare for and engage in gainful employment 34 C.F.R. § 361.1

  • The RSA Youth in Transition Services Units provide transition services, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 amended, to coordinate a set of activities for students designed around an outcome-oriented process that supports their movement from school to post-school activities including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, and independent living. Vocational rehabilitation transition services link students with disabilities, while still in school, with the vocational rehabilitation program to create a continuum of services leading to long-term employment outcomes for eligible students.
  • To learn more about RSA’s vocational rehabilitation process for youth with disabilities, refer to the RSA Youth in Transition Toolkit: “Explore the World of Work, Discover Your Career”. It provides the specific steps and activities that youth, schools, and parents need to understand to apply for services and work through the RSA process to receive services and find employment.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ADMINISTRATION (DDA) - public agency responsible for the oversight and coordination of all services and supports provided to qualified persons with intellectual disabilities in the District of Columbia.

  • DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

DC Department of Behavioral Health
609 H Street NE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20002
202-673-2200 (voice) | (202) 673-3433 fax | 202-673-7500 (TTY)
dmh@dc.gov

The Department of Behavioral Health's goal is to deliver mental health services that promote a patient's full recovery, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and are choice-driven. The Mental Health Rehabilitation Services (MHRS) system for community-based care offers: evaluation and or screening services, case management, counseling, intensive day treatment, crisis or emergency services, rehabilitation programs, psychiatric treatment, and specialized mental health services.

The ABLE National Resource Center (ANRC)
1667 K Street, NW Suite 640, Washington, DC 20006
(202) 296-2040 (voice)
info@ablenrc.org

The ABLE National Resource Center (ANRC) is a collaborative that brings together the investment, support and resources of some of the country's largest and most influential national disability organizations in an effort to accelerate the design and availability of ABLE accounts to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities and their families. Founded and managed by National Disability Institute (NDI), the ANRC's goal is to provide consistent, reliable information concerning the benefits of an ABLE account. In addition, the ANRC aims to educate individuals with disabilities and their families, state government and legislatures, financial service companies and financial planners and attorneys - who focus on trust and estate planning - about ABLE’s potential positive impact on the lives of millions of Americans with disabilities.

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - DC Parent Information Network
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Under a grant from the D.C. Department of Health’s (DOH), Community Health Administration (CHA), AJE is to develop and implement a District of Columbia Parent Information Network (DC PIN). DC PIN is to provide area residents with special health care needs information on family navigation; care coordination; community education; and individual advocacy.  DC PIN will serve all families and children ages 0 to 21 within the District of Columbia.

The Arc of the District of Columbia - Beyond High School: Navigating the Future
415 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20017
202-636-2950 (voice)
arcdc@arcdc.net

Our project, funded by a 1-year grant from the Walmart Foundation, will serve 30+ transitioning youth and their families during the '10-'11 school year, with hopes of securing funding to continue the project. Together with our partners, DC Public Schools and Developmental Disabilities Services, we will identify students and families who need assistance planning for their futures and navigating government systems and the many services available to them.

ASAN's Home and Community-Based Services Advocates Toolkit
PO Box 66122 , Washington, DC 20035
info@autisticadvocacy.org

ASAN has published a toolkit for advocates, families and administrators on how to ensure that people with disabilities receive Medicaid-funded Home and Community-Based Services in integrated settings that offer full access to the community.

ASAN’s new toolkit includes:

  • A Resource for Advocates and their Families explaining what the new rule means and how to make their voices heard as their states make plans to comply with the new rule. The resource includes scripts for writing to state Medicaid agencies about how they’d like their state’s HCBS program to change.
  • A Resource for State Administrators and Professionals on how to come into compliance with the new rule. This resource includes detailed guidance on the implications of the new rule, suggestions for elements to be included in the transition plan, and examples of useful tools and questionnaires for assessing provider compliance.
  • A Research Brief explaining how scattered-site supported housing can help states meet the integration and choice standards in the New Rule.
  • A Fact Sheet on integrated housing for people with disabilities.

Business Opportunity Workforce Development Center
2311 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC 20020
202-645-8620  (voice) | 202-645-0366 (fax)

Through the financial support of the US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, DDOT administers two federal programs aimed to fulfill its mission to help small business entrepreneurs successfully compete for procurement contracts in transportation construction. 

DC Department of Healthcare Finance
899 N. Capitol St, NE, 6039, Washington, DC 20002
202-442-5988  (voice) | (202) 442-4790 fax | 711 (TTY)
dhcf@dc.gov

DCHF programs include Medicaid, DC Healthy Family, and The DC Healthcare Alliance. The DC Healthcare Alliance offers a full range of health care services for its members. Benefits include: inpatient hospital care, outpatient medical care (including preventive care), emergency services, urgent care services, prescription drugs, rehabilitative services, home health care, dental services, specialty care, and wellness programs.

DC Healthy Families
6856 Eastern Avenue NW Suite 206, Washington, DC 20012
(202) 639-4030 (voice)

DC Healthy Families is a part of the Medicaid program that makes getting good health care easy. DC Healthy Families provides free health insurance to families with children and women who are pregnant. You don't have to have a job to get free health care. You don't have to get TANF (temporary assistance for needy families) and you don't have to be a US citizen.

Department of Housing and Urban Development District of Columbia Field Office
820 1st St, NE, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20002
202-275-9200 (voice) | 202-275-6381 (fax) | 202-275-6388 (TTY)

Housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability is illegal by federal law. If you have been trying to buy or rent a home or apartment and you believe your rights have been violated, you can file a fair housing complaint.

Disability.gov

Disability.gov connects people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that support them to important information about:
  • Disability benefits (guides, programs, applications, etc.)
  • Civil rights (ADA information, accessibility guidelines, employment rights, complaint procedures, etc.)
  • Community life (history of the independent living movement, personal care assistance services, sports and leisure activities, etc.)
  • Education (IDEA and IEP information, teaching materials and strategies, classroom supports, college prep, etc.)
  • Emergency preparedness (inclusive emergency planning, disaster recovery assistance, emergency service accessibility, etc.)
  • Employment (career planning, workforce development, internship programs, hiring and recruiting information, etc.)
  • Health care (disability and condition information, services and providers, caregiving options, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Housing (housing laws, home buying guides, supportive housing options, home modification, etc.)
  • Technology (accessible technology guidelines and standards, assistive information technology, assistive educational technology, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Transportation (laws, travel guides, providers, vehicle modification, safety and complaint procedures, etc.)

Disabled American Veterans (DAV)

We are dedicated to a single purpose: empowering veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. We accomplish this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life.

  • Providing free, professional assistance to veterans and their families in obtaining benefits and services earned through military service and provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and other agencies of government.
  • Providing outreach concerning its program services to the American people generally, and to disabled veterans and their families specifically.
  • Representing the interests of disabled veterans, their families, their widowed spouses and their orphans before Congress, the White House and the Judicial Branch, as well as state and local government.
  • Extending DAV’s mission of hope into the communities where these veterans and their families live through a network of state-level Departments and local chapters.
  • Providing a structure through which disabled veterans can express their compassion for their fellow veterans through a variety of volunteer programs.

Disabled Veterans National Foundation (DVNF)
(202) 737-0522 (voice)
info@dvnf.org

The Disabled Veterans National Foundation exists to provide critically needed support to disabled and at-risk veterans who leave the military wounded—physically or psychologically—after defending our safety and our freedom.

We achieve this mission by:

  • Providing an online resource database that allows veterans to navigate the complex process of seeking benefits that they are entitled to as a result of their military service, as well as additional resources they need.
  • Offering direct financial support to veteran organizations that address the unique needs of veterans, and whose missions align with that of DVNF.
  • Providing supplemental assistance to homeless and low-income veterans through the Health & Comfort program and various empowerment resources.
  • Serving as a thought leader on critical policy issues within the veteran community, and educating the public accordingly.

District of Columbia Housing Authority
1133 N. Capitol St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-535-1000 (voice)

The District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) manages subsidized housing programs, with a separate waiting list for each program. These housing programs are: 1) Public Housing, 2) Housing Choice Voucher-Tenant based Vouchers, 3) Housing Choice Voucher-Moderate Rehabilitation, and 4) Project Based Vouchers. Rental assistance is provided to low-income teens, young adults, and families through each housing program, and the assistance is based on household income. For complete details on these housing programs and renting assistance, contact the DCHA office.

DMH Access Help Line
1-888-7WE-HELP (voice) | 1 (888) 793-4357 | 202-727-3363 (TTY)

The DMH Access Help Line is the best way to access mental health rehabilitation services and its certified mental health service providers. Mental health professionals staff this 24-hour telephone line. Call the Access Help Line to: Get help with solving problems, share concerns, obtain emergency services, and decide whether to seek mental health or other types of services.

Entering the World of Work:A Guide to Employment Programs for Adults with Disabilities in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax & Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, covers the following key issues:

  • When to start preparing for entry into the workforce.
  • What you need to know to prepare for and stay on the job.
  • Whether working will affect your child’s benefits.
  • Which steps to take now to protect your loved one’s financial future.
  • How he or she will get around.

How Social Security Disability and Medicare Benefits Work Together

This Plan Prescriber article discusses the following topics:

  • Who qualifies for Medicare Disability?
  • Who is automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B?
  • Who needs to enroll manually for Medicare Disability?
  • How to apply manually for Medicare Disability

Income Maintenance Administration (IMA)
645 H St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-698-3900 (voice)

The mission of the Department of Human Services Income Maintenance Administration (IMA) is to determine the eligibility of applicants and to recertify the eligibility of recipients for federal and District-funded assistance programs, and to help heads of households receiving TANF benefits to become employed and move toward financial independence. IMA determines eligibility for benefits under the Temporary Cash Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medical Assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) (formerly Food Stamps), and Child Care Subsidy, Burial Assistance, Emergency Rental Assistance, and Interim Disability Assistance, Refugee Cash Assistance and  programs. In addition, IMA’s Food Stamp Employment and Training Program (FSET) provide employment and training services to able-bodied adults without dependents who receive food stamps.

Income Maintenance Administration, Anacostia
2100 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC
202-645-4614 (voice) | 202-727-3527 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Congress Heights
4001 S. Capitol St, SW, Washington, DC
202-645-4546 (voice) | 202-645-4546 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Fort Davis
3851 Alabama Ave, SE, Washington, DC
202-645-4500 (voice) | 202-645-6205 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, H Street
Income Maintenance Administration, 645 H St, NE, Washington, DC
202-698-4350 (voice) | 202-645-6205 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Taylor Street
1207 Taylor St, NW, Washington, DC
202-576-8000 (voice) | 202-576-8740 (fax)

Health (insurance)

M&L Special Needs Resources Webpage
5603 Potomac Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016
855.344.9771 (voice) | 855.344.9771
info@specialneedsplanning.net

At M&L Special Needs Planning, we feel that access to the right information is the key to planning a successful future. In keeping with our goal to keep you informed, and to provide you with the tools to enable you to plan a happy and successful future for your family, we have compiled a list of special needs resources.

Organizations: This special needs resource link will take you to a list of organizations that are dedicated to providing special needs services to your family and your child with special needs. The list includes organizations from all across the country.

Advocacy: Advocacy is a public process by an individual or group which attempts to influence governmental policy and resource allocations. We have compiled a list of advocacy groups that can help you fight for issues that are pertinent to you and your family.

Government and Social Security: A key aspect of our special needs planning services involves working with governmental agencies in order to access public resources. We have provided you with the websites for a number of agencies that you may need to contact in order to receive information or benefits that are important to your family’s future.

Housing: There are a number of organizations which provide information and services related to housing issues and questions. These special needs resources are excellent starting points for understanding housing services.

Disability: This link will take you to a list of websites which contain a wealth of information related to disability, including the link to disability.gov, a redesigned federal website that connects more than 50 million Americans with disabilities to thousands of resources on disability related issues, programs and services.

Local ARCS: The ARC is the world’s largest community-based organization of and for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This link will take you to the websites of the ARC chapters located in Washington D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. The ARCs are located in every state and are an excellent special needs resource for the family with special needs.

Post-Secondary Options: Many parents of children with special needs worry about what their child will do after high school. We have compiled a list of programs and special needs resources to help you access information and begin to plan for this transition in your child’s life.

Health: This list of websites will help you access information regarding medical insurance, medication control, as well as other health related issues.

Transitioning: The transition from school into adulthood is an essential and often complex step in the life of a person with special needs. These special needs resources will provide you with information and access to service providers who can help you and your child with special needs on his or her transitioning journey.

Employment: This section is geared towards employment resources for adults with special needs. There is a number of organization which compile information on this topic. We will add only the best special needs resources to this category.

Magazines and Articles: We have a gathered a number of really fantastic magazines and articles that can provide you with expert information, other special needs resources, and can provide links to other members of the special needs community.

General Assistance: These resources are designed to help with any overall questions, or to provide general information or help on a wide range of topics.

Children with Special Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special needs, the emotional process of the first diagnosis, and the important of early intervention. Early intervention services for both the Washington D.C. area, and nationwide are provided at the end of the article.

Children with Healthcare Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special healthcare needs, how it can impact the family situation, and statistics regarding children with special healthcare needs from across America. Resources to help you find help in obtaining a diagnosis, healthcare, and support are provided.

Special Education Schools: When it comes to helping children with special needs realize their fullest potential, special education schools are a valuable asset. Follow this link for a brief article outlining exactly why special needs schools are so important, and the ways in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 affects the way we educate our children with special needs.

Special Need Trust: A Special Needs Trust is the only legal solution to protect an individual with disabilities to qualify for government benefits. Follow this link for a brief explanation of what the term means and the different types of Special Needs Trusts, as well as other important points to consider when setting up your own Special Needs Trust.

Maryland Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs Resource Locator: In order to improve access to information about needed services and resources, Maryland’s Office for Genetics and People with Special Health Care Needs created the resource database. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) of Maryland created the online resource database for children and youth with special health care needs. In Maryland, over one third of families of these children report that they cannot easily access needed community based services and half of the same families report that they need help finding services for their youngsters. For families in rural areas of the state, it can be even more difficult to find specialty services.

Cerebral Palsy Guide is a website that is intended to give parents of children with cerebral palsy simple, straightforward information about cerebral palsy and its treatment, as well as to help families connect with medical and legal professionals. Designed specifically with parents of children newly diagnosed with CP in mind, the website strives to offer “peace, healing, and happiness.”

Office of Disability Rights
441 4th St, NW, Suite 729N, Washington, DC 20001
202-724-5055 (voice) | 202-727-3363 (TTY)
mathew.mccollough@dc.gov

The mission of the DC Office of Disability Rights (ODR) is to ensure that DC programs are fully accessible to people with disabilities. ODR is committed to inclusion, community-based services, and self-determination for people with disabilities. ODR is responsible for making sure that the DC government satisfies the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other disability rights laws. ODR (1) looks into discrimination complaints and other issues made by community members, (2) provides ADA training and other help to DC agencies to ensure that all people with disabilities are treated with respect and integrity, and (3) works with community members and government partners to ensure that people with disabilities have opportunities to become productive citizens within their communities with appropriate supports.

The Social Security Administration
1-800-772-1213 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Anacostia
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Suite 130, Washington, DC 20020
202-755-0672 (voice) | 202-673-5168 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, M Street Office
2100 M St, NW, Washington, DC 20037
202-653-5040 (voice) | 202-233-2012 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Postal Plaza (Brentwood)
1905-B 9th St, NE, Washington, DC 20018
202-376-5049 (voice) | 202-755-0630 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Shepard Park
7820 Eastern Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20012
202-673-5159 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

SSA Benefits For People With Disabilities

The Social Security Administration (SSA)’s Benefits for People with Disabilities webpage:

  • Provides overviews of available programs and services
  • Outlines benefit eligibility requirements
  • Offers application and appeals assistance
  • Addresses frequently asked questions

Student Veterans of America
1625 K Street NW, Suite 320 , Washington , DC 20006
(202) 223-4710 (voice)

Student Veterans of America envisions a nation where all student veterans succeed in post-secondary programs and contribute to civilian society in meaningful ways. SVA provides the resources and support to do so through five major initiatives. We maintain a commitment to Support Chapters through leadership training, grants, and networking opportunities that facilitate the development of successful student-run organizations. An essential component of chapter work is advocating for supportive campus services and programs. At the national level, SVA’s Advocacy efforts ensure policies are not only supportive for veterans in their transition to school and employment, but also for the entire military community. To best serve this large community, SVA Develops Partnerships with other organizations to provide scholarships, mentorships, employment, and benefits counseling. Yet, our support doesn’t end at graduation. Student Veterans of America is developing a networking program that will Connect Alumni veterans with even more professional opportunities. These initiatives are designed to bring veterans closer to their degrees, yet little data exists on student veterans' academic performance. By Investing in Research, SVA hopes to fill that void and showcase student veteran success.


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