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Understanding Your Rights

Learn more about Understanding Your Rights | View General Legal & Advocacy Resources

DC Department on Disability Services
250 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024
202-730-1700 (voice) | (202) 730-1843 (fax) | (202) 730-1516 (TTY)
dds@dc.gov

The DC Department on Disability Services (DDS) provides the residents of DC with information, oversight, and coordination of services for people with disabilities and those who support them, such as service providers and employers. DDS has two Administrations ( Rehabilitation Services Administration & Developmental Disabilities Administration ) that oversee and coordinate services for residents with disabilities through a network of private and non-profit providers.

REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) - focuses on employment, ensuring that persons with disabilities achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and sustaining employment, economic self-sufficiency and independence. RSA’s program is designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, and informed choice, in order to prepare for and engage in gainful employment 34 C.F.R. § 361.1

  • The RSA Youth in Transition Services Units provide transition services, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 amended, to coordinate a set of activities for students designed around an outcome-oriented process that supports their movement from school to post-school activities including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, and independent living. Vocational rehabilitation transition services link students with disabilities, while still in school, with the vocational rehabilitation program to create a continuum of services leading to long-term employment outcomes for eligible students.
  • To learn more about RSA’s vocational rehabilitation process for youth with disabilities, refer to the RSA Youth in Transition Toolkit: “Explore the World of Work, Discover Your Career”. It provides the specific steps and activities that youth, schools, and parents need to understand to apply for services and work through the RSA process to receive services and find employment.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ADMINISTRATION (DDA) - public agency responsible for the oversight and coordination of all services and supports provided to qualified persons with intellectual disabilities in the District of Columbia.

  • DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

DC Department of Behavioral Health
609 H Street NE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20002
202-673-2200 (voice) | (202) 673-3433 fax | 202-673-7500 (TTY)
dmh@dc.gov

The Department of Behavioral Health's goal is to deliver mental health services that promote a patient's full recovery, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and are choice-driven. The Mental Health Rehabilitation Services (MHRS) system for community-based care offers: evaluation and or screening services, case management, counseling, intensive day treatment, crisis or emergency services, rehabilitation programs, psychiatric treatment, and specialized mental health services.

DC Department of Employment Services
4058 Minnesota AVE NE, Washington, DC 20019
202-724-7000 (voice)
does@dc.gov

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) provides a wide variety of services to job seekers through its One-Stop Career Centers. A vocational rehabilitation counselor who works for the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) is also available at the One-Stop Career Centers. Please note that in order to receive services from an Employment Specialist at the One-Stop Career Center, job seekers must complete an assessment that includes a reading test. Residents who test below an eighth grade reading level will be referred to other agencies for assistance.

Family Voices
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC
(202) 265-1432 (voice)

Family Voices is a national organization working in collaboration with various local organizations on behalf of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) . Family Voices provides parents of children with chronic conditions access to specialty healthcare resources and to other families.

NOTE: Family Voices and the Family-to-Family Health Information Center are separate programs. The latter is grant funded under various Family Voices affiliates.

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc.
25 E Street, NW (on the 4th floor), Washington, DC 20001
202-678-8060 (voice)

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. educates and trains parents, teens, and young adults with disabilities about laws that govern public and special education or other conditions that impede learning. Training sessions are offered to achieve the following: clarify legal obligations; assist families to prepare for IEP and ITP meetings; provide training and courses to families on educational services; and help parents and transitioning students there are disagreements about educational plans

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - DC Parent Information Network
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Under a grant from the D.C. Department of Health’s (DOH), Community Health Administration (CHA), AJE is to develop and implement a District of Columbia Parent Information Network (DC PIN). DC PIN is to provide area residents with special health care needs information on family navigation; care coordination; community education; and individual advocacy.  DC PIN will serve all families and children ages 0 to 21 within the District of Columbia.

Advocates for Justice and Education, Inc. - Parent to Parent Program
1012 Pennsylvania AVE SE, Washington, DC 20003
202) 678-8060 (voice) | (202) 678-8062 (fax)

Our Parent-to-Parent Program was created to provide parents with a supportive network of peers. This program offers parents an opportunity to develop leadership skills and offer parents in similar situations with support. Peer supporters are provided a comprehensive six-week training that focuses on educational advocacy, the laws supporting special education and related services, and leadership training.

American University, Disability Support Services
4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20016
202-885-1000 (voice)

The mission of Disability Support Services (DSS) is to ensure that students with physical, medical, or psychological disabilities have equal access to university programs and services. DSS provides or coordinates a range of services and accommodations that meet the individual needs of a student based on the impact of the specific disability. Please note that students with learning disabilities or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder should contact the Academic Support Center at 202-885-3360 or asc@american.edu.

ASAN's Toolkit for Advocates on Health Care and the Transition to Adulthood
PO Box 66122, Washington , DC 20035
info@autisticadvocacy.org

ASAN is proud to announce the release of a comprehensive toolkit to empower people with disabilities and their families to manage their own health care as they transition to adulthood.

Transition to Adulthood: A Health Care Guide for Youth and Families provides people with people with disabilities and their families with information on how to choose a source of health care coverage, create a health care support network, integrate health care transition goals into their educational plans, and manage their health care. It includes useful guides and worksheets for keeping track of health care records, making doctor's appointments, and talking to doctors about health concerns.

The toolkit also includes Model Supported Health Care Decision-Making Legislation and its accompanying Questions and Answers resource. The model legislation, which ASAN developed in collaboration with the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, would enable people with intellectual or developmental disabilities to name a trusted person to help communicate with doctors, understand health care information, make informed decisions about health care, and/or carry out daily health-related activities. Advocates can use this model legislation when talking to their state legislators about ways to support people make independent health care decisions.

ASAN's policy brief, The Transition to Adulthood for Youth with ID/DD: A review of research, policy, and next steps, discusses the range of challenges facing youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities as they approach adulthood, including potential loss of health care coverage, barriers to obtaining adult-oriented care, and lack of support in making health care decisions. It outlines several policy recommendations to eliminate these barriers, including expanding access to income-based Medicaid coverage, increased education and awareness of the importance of transition and decision-making supports, and increased research on best practices in transition planning.

Autism Society - DC Chapter
5167 7th Street, NE, Washington, DC 20011
202-561-5300 (voice)

ASDC provides monthly support meetings for parents, siblings, and other caregivers to freely discuss their unique needs and interests. Summer Camp Program for Children and Adults with Autism - one week residential summer camp for children and adults with autism through the District of Columbia Autistic Educational Program.

Bread for the City Legal Clinic NW
1525 7th St, NW, Washington, DC 20001
202-265-2400 (voice)

Volunteer and staff attorneys represent clients in landlord-tenant disputes, represent claimants who have been denied Social Security disability benefits, advocate in fair hearings for other public benefits, and represent clients in family law matters including child custody, civil protection orders, child support and divorce.

Business Opportunity Workforce Development Center
2311 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC 20020
202-645-8620  (voice) | 202-645-0366 (fax)

Through the financial support of the US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, DDOT administers two federal programs aimed to fulfill its mission to help small business entrepreneurs successfully compete for procurement contracts in transportation construction. 

The Catholic University of America, Disability Support Services
620 Michigan Ave NE, 207 Pryzbyla Center, Washington, DC 20064
202-319-5211 (voice) | 202-319-5126 (fax)

Answers questions concerning accommodations and services available and provides information about and give referrals to admissions, registration, financial aid, and other services within the university. DSS can help assess needs in such areas as housing accommodations, attendants, interpreters, readers, transportation, classroom and course accommodations, tutors, notetakers, and adaptive equipment.

Correctional Education Guidance Package

Developed through a partnership between the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education, this guidance package is designed to inform the efforts of states, school districts, and juvenile justice facilities that serve system-involved youth. The package includes recommendations and federal requirements for ensuring that youth in confinement receive an education comparable to those provided in traditional public school settings.

The package includes the following components:

  • Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings, jointly issued by DOJ and ED.
  • Dear Colleague Letter on Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for Students with Disabilities in Correctional Facilities, issued by ED's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, clarifies state and public agency obligations to provide a free, appropriate public education to eligible students with disabilities who reside in correctional facilities.
  • Dear Colleague Letter on Civil Rights of Students in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities, issued by DOJ's Civil Rights Division and ED's Office for Civil Rights, stipulates that juvenile justice residential facilities receiving DOJ or ED funding must comply with the federal civil rights laws that these agencies enforce.
  • Dear Colleague Letter on Access to Federal Pell Grants for Students in Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities, issued by ED's Office of Postsecondary Education, provides campus financial aid professionals the eligibility requirements for youth residing in juvenile justice facilities to apply for Pell Grant.

DC Center for Independent Living
1400 Florida Ave, NE, Suite 3, Washington, DC 20002
202-388-0033 (voice)

The DCCIL is managed by and for persons with a variety of disabilities. The DCCIL is a community based, private non-profit organization that promotes independent life styles for persons with significant disabilities in the District of Columbia. DCCIL has four core independent living services: (1) Independent living skills training including travel training, (2) Peer counseling, (3) Advocacy and legal services, and (4) Information and referral to community services.

DC Developmental Disabilities Council
441 4th Street, NW, 729 North, Washington, DC 20001

The Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) helps to empower individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities by:

  • Educating them about local disability rights laws
  • Creating and supporting inclusive health, education, employment, housing, recreation, childcare, and quality assurance programs
  • Connecting them with other community and governmental organizations that provide disability support services

DC LEARNs (D.C. Literacy Education, Advocacy and Resource Network)
1612 K St, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006
202-331-0141 (voice) | 202-331-0143 (fax)

DC LEARNs is a nonprofit citywide coalition of organizations providing adult, family, and children’s literacy services to the residents of Washington, DC. Their work includes: training, policy work and analysis, pilot projects, volunteer recruitment, and gathering and providing information on literacy programs.

Department of Housing and Urban Development District of Columbia Field Office
820 1st St, NE, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20002
202-275-9200 (voice) | 202-275-6381 (fax) | 202-275-6388 (TTY)

Housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability is illegal by federal law. If you have been trying to buy or rent a home or apartment and you believe your rights have been violated, you can file a fair housing complaint.

Disability.gov

Disability.gov connects people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that support them to important information about:
  • Disability benefits (guides, programs, applications, etc.)
  • Civil rights (ADA information, accessibility guidelines, employment rights, complaint procedures, etc.)
  • Community life (history of the independent living movement, personal care assistance services, sports and leisure activities, etc.)
  • Education (IDEA and IEP information, teaching materials and strategies, classroom supports, college prep, etc.)
  • Emergency preparedness (inclusive emergency planning, disaster recovery assistance, emergency service accessibility, etc.)
  • Employment (career planning, workforce development, internship programs, hiring and recruiting information, etc.)
  • Health care (disability and condition information, services and providers, caregiving options, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Housing (housing laws, home buying guides, supportive housing options, home modification, etc.)
  • Technology (accessible technology guidelines and standards, assistive information technology, assistive educational technology, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Transportation (laws, travel guides, providers, vehicle modification, safety and complaint procedures, etc.)

District of Columbia Housing Authority
1133 N. Capitol St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-535-1000 (voice)

The District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) manages subsidized housing programs, with a separate waiting list for each program. These housing programs are: 1) Public Housing, 2) Housing Choice Voucher-Tenant based Vouchers, 3) Housing Choice Voucher-Moderate Rehabilitation, and 4) Project Based Vouchers. Rental assistance is provided to low-income teens, young adults, and families through each housing program, and the assistance is based on household income. For complete details on these housing programs and renting assistance, contact the DCHA office.

DMH Access Help Line
1-888-7WE-HELP (voice) | 1 (888) 793-4357 | 202-727-3363 (TTY)

The DMH Access Help Line is the best way to access mental health rehabilitation services and its certified mental health service providers. Mental health professionals staff this 24-hour telephone line. Call the Access Help Line to: Get help with solving problems, share concerns, obtain emergency services, and decide whether to seek mental health or other types of services.

Easter Seals Project Action
1425 K St, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20005
202-459-4003 (voice) | 202-448-1458

Project ACTION!, is the District's self-advocacy coalition for adults with developmental disabilities. Members of Project ACTION! are powerful advocates who work individually and together to let their voices be heard. They work to break down barriers, create partnerships, and change their communities so they are inclusive and supportive of people with disabilities. Members are residents of the District and suburban Maryland. During their meetings, members learn and practice advocacy skills, including how to testify before City Council, how to serve on boards and committees, what current issues affect them, and more. Project ACTION! members facilitate training for local and national self-advocates, DDA staff, and service provider staff. They mentor new self-advocates and youth advocates. They are often sought out by City Council and other government leaders for their opinion and thoughts on different legislation and initiatives. Project ACTION! meetings are normally held on the second Saturday of each month in an accessible location in northeast DC. Please call to confirm the next meeting date. For more information about Project ACTION!, meeting dates, training, conferences, etc., call Victor Robinson at 202-459-4003 or e-mail him at vrobinson@dcqualitytrust.org. Or you can call Phyllis Holton at 202-448-1458 or e-mail her at pholton@dcqualitytrust.org. You can check out their link at www.dcqualitytrust.org/pages/page06b.shtml.

Fair and Affordable Housing: The Activist's Blueprint for Action

Mortgage Calculator's "Fair and Affordable Housing: The Activist's Blueprint for Action" is a resource guide designed to help those fighting for fair and affordable housing in their communities have an even greater impact. The guide includes links to:

  • National housing organization websites, research, and publications
  • Brief summaries of housing laws and executive orders
  • Options for reporting housing discrimination
  • And more

Gallaudet University, Office for Students with Disabilities
Jordan Student Academic Center, Rm 1220, 800 Florida Ave, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-651-5256 (voice) | 202-651-5887 (fax)
oswd@gallaudet.edu

The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSWD) provides individually tailored, comprehensive, support services and programs for students with disabilities. OSWD empowers eligible students to succeed in their pursuit of higher education by striving to assure equal access and opportunity to curricular and extra-curricular activities. Supporting the ideal of life-long learning, OSWD encourages and provides experiences and opportunities to build confidence beyond the classroom. Student autonomy is encouraged through the provision of reasonable accommodations, academic support groups, self-advocacy, and compensatory training. OSWD employs a student-centered interactive model in which collaboration among professionals and OSWD students results in a nondiscriminatory academic environment. In addition, OSWD provides professional development services and programs for faculty and staff and for community-based professionals.

George Mason University, Office of Disability Support
Student Union Bldg I, Rm 211, MSN 5C9, 4400 University Dr, Fairfax, VA 22030
703-993-2474 (voice) | 703-993-4306 (fax) | 703-993-2476 (TTY)

The Office of Disability Services at George Mason University offers a variety of services for students with documented disabilities, including learning disabilities, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/low vision, mobility limitations, attention deficit disorders (ADD/ ADHD), psychiatric disorders, and medical disabilities. We encourage both prospective and current students to learn more about our services by going to our web site at and/or calling our office to make an appointment with an ODS coordinator.

George Washington University, Disability Support Services
Marvin Center, Suite 242, 800 21st St, NW, Washington, DC 20052
202-994-8250 (voice) | 202-994-7610 (fax)
dss@gwu.edu

The George Washington University believes in the equality of people, the value of individual differences, and the unending possibilities for growth and the development of the human spirit. With that philosophy, the University established Disability Support Services (DSS) in 1978 to support students with disabilities so that they may participate fully in university life, derive the greatest benefit from their educational experiences, and achieve maximum personal success. DSS currently serves over 700 GW students with a wide variety of disabilities, as well as those temporarily disabled by injury or illness.

Georgetown University, Academic Resource Center
Leavey Center, Suite 335, Box 571235 , Washington, DC 20057
202-687-8354 (voice)
arc@georgetown.edu

Georgetown University is committed to providing academic support for all students and to integrating students with disabilities as fully as possible into all aspects of University life. The Academic Resource Center fulfills this mission by providing assistance in study skills necessary for academic achievement through individual consultations or workshops; accommodations to students with disabilities under the ADA and Section 504; facilities and support services to help ensure access for students with disabilities.

Howard University, Special Student Services
Howard Center, Suite 725, 2225 Georgia Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20059
202-238-2420 (voice)

All students attending the Howard University with a documented disabilities are eligible and encouraged to register for services.

HSCF 2015 Partnership Network Brochure

The HSC Foundation's 2015 Partnership Network brochure provides an alphabetical list of its organizational partners by type. Each entry includes a description of the highlighted organization's services, along with a point of contact.

Jenny Hatch Justice Project
202-448-1448 (voice)
JHJP@dcqualitytrust.org

Sponsored by Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, The Jenny Hatch Justice Project (JHJP) supports the right of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities to make decisions about their lives. JHJP provides access to:

  • Recent research publications on independent living services and alternatives to guardianship
  • Informative brochures on decision-making
  • A sample training program
  • Legal, educational, and transition resources

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
(800) 526-7234 (voice) | (877) 781-9403 (TTY)

AskJAN.org is an online resource center designed to provide employers, people with disabilities, their family members, service providers, educators, and others with technical assistance on job accommodations and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The site offers a number of ways to find this information, including:

  • Search
  • Information by Disability
  • Information by Topic
  • Site Map

M&L Special Needs Planning, LLC
1050 Connecticut AVE NW 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 248-7113 (voice)
maedi@specialneedsplanning.net

Comprehensive Special Needs Financial Life Plans -Families retain M&L Special Needs Planning, LLC to create a custom comprehensive special needs financial plan. We conduct a series of meetings in which we identify and prioritize the family's goals and objectives; the goals and objectives of the special needs individual; analyze the present financial situation with respect to both of these goals, review family resources, legal documents, investments, insurance and other related issues. From this information we create a plan with recommendations and steps to maximize and protect family and government resources. If the recommendations are acceptable to the family, we work with the family to implement the recommendatons and set up periodic reviews. In addition to the Comprehensive Special Needs Financial Life Planning we have created a series of workshops to assist in understanding the complexities and nuances of special needs financial planning.

Montgomery College, Developmental Education and Workforce Access Program (includes Challenge Program)
51 Mannakee Street, Rockville, MD 20850
240-567-5000 (voice)

This is a custom-tailored learning community program for students with special needs exiting high school. GTP is a two-year, tuition-based, credit-free certificate program. The overall objective is to enable students to transition to greater independent living through functional education, residential, vocational, and life-skills services. The Challenge Program provides unique courses for adults with developmental disabilities to help them function more independently in their homes, at work, and in the community. Of equal importance, students will have the opportunity to increase their social and community awareness by learning at Montgomery College.

Montgomery College, Disability Support Services
Counseling and Advising Bldg, Rm CB122, 51 Mannakee St , Rockville, MD 20850
240-567-5058 (voice) | 240-567-5097 (fax) | 301-294-9672 (TTY)
dss@montgomerycollege.edu

Disability Support Services (DSS) is dedicated to assisting students with disabilities accomplish their personal, scholastic and career goals. We do this by teaching academic and advocacy skills; eliminating the physical, technical and attitudinal barriers that limit opportunities; and promoting an awareness of the experience of persons with disabilities within social, political, and economic constructs.

The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health
750 17th St, NW, Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20006
202-223-1500 (voice) | 202-496-9067 (fax)

Our mission is to enhance the physical and emotional well-being of adolescents, especially low-income and minority adolescents, by promoting access to comprehensive, interdisciplinary physical, behavioral, and reproductive health care. The National Alliance supports models of care that incorporate a positive youth development philosophy and operate in collaboration with schools and community-based health promotion initiatives. We also seek to ensure that all adolescents have insurance for the services they require.

National Center for Autism Resources & Education (nCARE)

WE SUPPORT NATIONALLY:

  • RESEARCH related to Autism and related neuro-developmental disorders,
  • PUBLIC AWARENESS about incidence of disorders and effective treatment,
  • ACCURATE INFORMATION dissemination of up to date, research based information to families, educators and medical professionals, and
  • EDUCATION of parents, advocates, clinicians, educators, lawyers and the community as to best practices and appropriate treatment. Promoting a collaborative, cross training approach.

THIS IS DONE THROUGH:

  • BEING A SOURCE of accurate, up to date, research based information,
  • TRAINING families, educators and clinicians and lawyers, through community training programs,
  • SUPPORTING community programs that promote awareness about disabilities and support families and individuals with disabilities,
  • PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE through education advocacy, self advocacy, independent living and home and community based services for children and adults with Autism and related neuro-developmental disorders,
  • FUNDING of research that addresses the quality of life for parents and their children with Autism, and
  • SPONSORING quality Special Education Advocacy trainings through NSEAI, which provides on-site, on-line training, and conferences.

New View, LLC
966 Hungerford Dr, Suite 7, Rockville, MD 20850
240-535-4036 (voice)
contact@newviewot.com

New View, LLC establishes relationships with children, young adults, adults, and their families and/or educational support team to determine relevant, individualized, and client-centered recommendations related to education, work, self-care, and leisure. We provide quality therapeutic services across the lifespan to create meaningful life experiences that help to improve independence and confidence in education, work, self-care, and leisure activities. We provide occupational therapy treatment and evaluation in addition to vocational, career guidance, and assessment.

Office of Disability Rights
441 4th St, NW, Suite 729N, Washington, DC 20001
202-724-5055 (voice) | 202-727-3363 (TTY)
mathew.mccollough@dc.gov

The mission of the DC Office of Disability Rights (ODR) is to ensure that DC programs are fully accessible to people with disabilities. ODR is committed to inclusion, community-based services, and self-determination for people with disabilities. ODR is responsible for making sure that the DC government satisfies the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other disability rights laws. ODR (1) looks into discrimination complaints and other issues made by community members, (2) provides ADA training and other help to DC agencies to ensure that all people with disabilities are treated with respect and integrity, and (3) works with community members and government partners to ensure that people with disabilities have opportunities to become productive citizens within their communities with appropriate supports.

OSSE
810 First St, NE, 9th Floor, Washington, DC 20002
(202) 727-6436 (voice)
osse@dc.gov

Sets statewide policies, provides resources and support, and exercises accountability for ALL public education in DC.

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
5335 Wisconsin AVE NW Suite 825, Washington, DC 20015
(202) 448-1450  (voice)
info@dcqualitytrust.org

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities is an advocacy organization that is an independent catalyst for change in the lives of people of all ages with developmental disabilities. Quality Trust advocates, monitors, provides legal education, training, and family navigation to residents of the District of Columbia.

Securing a Future for Your Child with a Disability: A Parents Guide to Adult Services in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, will help you answer the following questions:

  • Who’s in charge of key life decisions.
  • Whether your adult child is eligible for government support.
  • What kind of jobs and day support programs are available.
  • Which recreational activities are best.
  • How he or she will get around.
  • Where they’ll live.

The Social Security Administration
1-800-772-1213 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Anacostia
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Suite 130, Washington, DC 20020
202-755-0672 (voice) | 202-673-5168 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, M Street Office
2100 M St, NW, Washington, DC 20037
202-653-5040 (voice) | 202-233-2012 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Postal Plaza (Brentwood)
1905-B 9th St, NE, Washington, DC 20018
202-376-5049 (voice) | 202-755-0630 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Shepard Park
7820 Eastern Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20012
202-673-5159 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

TASH
1025 Vermont Ave, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005
202-540-9020 (voice) | 202-540-9019 (fax)
operations@tash.org

TASH is a civil rights organization for, and of, people with mental disability, autism, cerebral palsy, physical disabilities and other conditions that make full integration a challenge. Although TASH 's work is often on a global level, equally, if not more significant, is the direct support we provide individuals with disabilities and their family members. We serve as a clearinghouse for the daily reporting of treatment that is unjust or that limits opportunity. We provide information, linkage with resources, expert assistance toward fighting inequities, legal expertise, and targeted advocacy. We bring to the assistance of individuals in need, the backing of our thousands of members worldwide and the support of a national organization committed to social justice for all people.

Tax Tips for the Deaf

One in five Americans has a severe hearing loss, yet may not be aware of the special tax deductions and credits allowed by the Internal Revenue Service. Knowing about these deductions and credits can help you know which receipts and paperwork to save so you can claim them on your taxes.

Telecommunicating and Accessibility Issues for the Deaf

This webpage offers a series of educative articles, compiled by Five 9 Call Center Software, on hearing impairment and accessibility issues. These articles provide specific information about:

  • The history of telecommunications devices
  • Telephone relay services
  • Using a TTY system
  • Accessing 9-1-1 emergency services
  • Ongoing efforts to improve telecommunication
  • Overcoming isolation through social media
  • Making distance learning courses more inclusive
  • The challenges of communicating in the workplace
  • Accessibility and the Americans with Disabilities Act

This webpage also offers informative resources related to hearing impairment. These resources include:

  • Webpages devoted to deaf culture
  • Reviews of assistive technology products
  • A database of closed-captioned, educational DVDs

Trinity DC, Disability Student Services
Academic Service Center, Library, 1st,
202-884-9358 (voice)

If you are a student with a psychological, cognitive, and/or physical disability, Disability Student Services (DSS) is here to ensure that you receive support services that will equalize your access for your courses and campus activities. In contrast to high school, where students with disabilities are entitled to certain services, in college, you must become approved or eligible for services based on the guidelines set forth by your college/university (Read "Disability in Higher Education"). At Trinity, this means that you must first register with DSS before you can request support services.

U.S. International Council on Disabilities
1012 14th St. NW, Suite 105, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 347-0102 (voice) | (202) 347-0351 (fax)
info@usicd.org

The U.S. International Council on Disabilities (USICD) is a non-profit that promotes the inclusion of disability perspectives in U.S. foreign policy and aid and provides opportunities for domestic disability rights organizations to interface with their international counterparts.

UDC-DCSL
David A. Clarke School of Law, Bldg 38, 2nd Floor, 4200 Connecticut Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20008
202-274-7400 (voice)

UDC School of Law students and faculty supervisors in the Juvenile and Special Education Law Clinic represent children and parents (or guardians) primarily in special education matters. Over the past sixteen years, the clinic faculty pioneered and developed a nationally-acclaimed approach to addressing the problems of delinquency by supplementing traditional delinquency representation with, where appropriate, advocacy to address the special education needs of the children who are the subject of those delinquency proceedings.

University Legal Services
220 I Street, NE, Suite 130, Washington, DC 20002
202-547-0198 (voice)
jbrown@uls-dc.org

University Legal Services (ULS) is a private, non-profit organization that serves as the District of Columbia's federally mandated protection and advocacy system for the human, legal, and service rights of people with disabilities. Our services include information and referral; education and training; investigation of reported or suspected instances of abuse or neglect; individual advocacy; systemic litigation; and technical assistance regarding legislative and policy concerns. All services are offered free of charge to eligible individuals in accordance with ULS' available resources and policies.

University of Maryland College Park, Disability Support Services
4th Floor, Susquehanna Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
301-314-7682 (voice)

The mission of the Disablility Support Service is to coordinate services that ensure individuals with disabilities equal access to University of Maryland College Park programs.

University of the District of Columbia, Disability Resource Center
4200 Connecticut Ave, NW, Bldg 44, Rm A-39 , Washington, DC 20008
202-274-6417 (voice) | 202-274-5375 (fax) | 202-448-7213 (videophone) (TTY)

The University of the District of Columbia (UDC) is an urban land grant institution. UDC is a comprehensive public institution offering affordable post-secondary degrees at the associates, baccalaureate, and graduate levels. The Disability Supports Services Offices provides accommodations and assistance to students with documented disabilities. It is the student’s responsibility to request accommodations. Students will also need to provide recent documentation of their disability and recent testing and evaluations of their disability.

Youth Empowered to Succeed
1400 Florida AVE NE Suite 3A, Washington, DC 20002
202-280-6882 (voice) | 202-280-6883

COME ONE! COME ALL!

Are You Between The Ages Of 18-26 With A Disability Who Wants To Help Other People With Disabilities? Are You Looking For Services To Help You Solve Everyday Issues? Do You Want To Learn About Advocacy?

Come discuss issues that affect you and others like yourself. The DCCIL Youth Peer Support and Group will provide you with an outlet to talk about issues that not only affect you, but others with disabilities. Connect with others and make a difference together. The group will meet every other week starting Wednesday, January 9th, 2013 from 2:30-3:30 pm. Spaces will fill fast so reserve your spot now! Please fill out the registration form below and return it to an Independent Living Specialist at our Main, Northwest or Anacostia Satellite Office(s):

Y.E.S Registration Form
NAME: _________________________________________________________
ADDRESS: ______________________________________________________
PHONE: ________________________________________________________
E-MAIL (OPTIONAL): ____________________________________________


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