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Office of Disability Rights (ODR) Monthly Newsletter
(202) 724 - 5055 (voice)

The Office of Disability Rights (ODR) strives to ensure that DC residents with disabilities have full access to community-based facilities, services, programs, benefits, and activities funded and operated by the City. As part of its ongoing commitment to inclusion, the ODR publishes a monthly newsletter called "ADA Today". The newsletter features information about:

  • Disability Awareness
  • Health
  • Education
  • Transportation
  • Recreational Activities
  • Federal News

Capitol Hill Supportive Services Program
700 Constitution Avenue, N.E., Washington, DC 20002
202-675-0510 (voice) | 202-547-7030 (fax)

The Capitol Hill Supportive Services Program (CHSSP) helps individuals with disabilities in the following areas:

  • Employment
  • Independent Living
  • Intake and Assessment

College Living Experience
(800) 486-5058 (voice)

College Living Experience (CLE) provides individualized post-secondary academic, career, independent living, and social supports to students with autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, ADHD, and other varying exceptionalities.

Accessible Resources for Independence, Inc., (ARI)
1406-B Crain Highway South, Suite 206, Glen Burnie, MD 21061-4297
410.636.2274 (voice) | 443-713-3909 (fax)
arinow@arinow.org

Accessible Resources for Independence, Inc., (ARI) provides support and services to people with disabilities in Anne Arundel and Howard counties in Maryland. ARI serves persons of any age and with any disabilities, including children, the elderly and veterans by providing at least four core services. These are:

  • Advocacy
  • Information and Referral
  • Independent Living Skills Training
  • Peer Counseling

Services and support designed to foster independent living include:

  • Equal Access
  • Removal of physical and attitudinal barriers
  • Affordable and accessible housing search
  • Accessible transportation
  • Equal opportunities for employment

ADDitude Magazine

ADDitude Magazine provides readers with information about:

  • Adult ADHD
  • Parenting ADHD children
  • ADHD treatment
  • School & learning disabilities
  • ADHD symptoms & diagnosis
  • Finding resources

American Association of People with Disabilities
2013 H Street, NW, 5th Floor, Washington , DC 20006
202-457-0046 (voice) | 866-536-4461(fax)

The American Association of People with Disabilities is the nation's largest disability rights organization. We promote equal opportunity, economic power, independent living, and political participation for people with disabilities. Our members, including people with disabilities and our family, friends, and supporters, represent a powerful force for change.

The Arc Montgomery County
Administration: 11600 Nebel Street, Rockville, MD 20852
Admin: 301.984.5777 (voice)
mariad@arcmontmd.org

The Arc Montgomery County identifies, creates and sustains inclusive communities that embrace and engage individuals and families affected by intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The Arc of the District of Columbia - Beyond High School: Navigating the Future
415 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20017
202-636-2950 (voice)
arcdc@arcdc.net

Our project, funded by a 1-year grant from the Walmart Foundation, will serve 30+ transitioning youth and their families during the '10-'11 school year, with hopes of securing funding to continue the project. Together with our partners, DC Public Schools and Developmental Disabilities Services, we will identify students and families who need assistance planning for their futures and navigating government systems and the many services available to them.

ASAN's Home and Community-Based Services Advocates Toolkit
PO Box 66122 , Washington, DC 20035
info@autisticadvocacy.org

ASAN has published a toolkit for advocates, families and administrators on how to ensure that people with disabilities receive Medicaid-funded Home and Community-Based Services in integrated settings that offer full access to the community.

ASAN’s new toolkit includes:

  • A Resource for Advocates and their Families explaining what the new rule means and how to make their voices heard as their states make plans to comply with the new rule. The resource includes scripts for writing to state Medicaid agencies about how they’d like their state’s HCBS program to change.
  • A Resource for State Administrators and Professionals on how to come into compliance with the new rule. This resource includes detailed guidance on the implications of the new rule, suggestions for elements to be included in the transition plan, and examples of useful tools and questionnaires for assessing provider compliance.
  • A Research Brief explaining how scattered-site supported housing can help states meet the integration and choice standards in the New Rule.
  • A Fact Sheet on integrated housing for people with disabilities.

The Campbell Center

The Campbell Center is a peer-run resource center for individuals living with mental health challenges. We seek social change on an individual level by supporting wellness and recovery, training in leadership and micro-enterprise, and fostering community engagement. 

CLE Summer Career Development Program
401 North Washington Street, Suite 420, Rockville, MD 20850
800-486-5058 (voice)
info@experiencecle.com

Summer Career Development prepares high school students with learning differences such as ADHD, Learning Disabilities, and Autism Spectrum Disorders for future employment. CLE’s 3-week program provides students the opportunity to gain work experience by engaging with the local community. During this time, students will participate in a series of volunteer placements to develop their employment skills across three different industries. Student activities will also focus on enhancing:

  • Independence
  • Career Readiness
  • Self-Determination
  • Leadership & Interpersonal Skills
  • Organization & Time Management

CLE Summer Exploration Program
401 North Washington Street, Suite 420, Rockville, MD 20850
800-486-5058 (voice)
info@experiencecle.com

CLE Summer Exploration is a program for diverse learners entering their senior year or who have recently graduated. Summer Exploration is a preview of independent living in a college environment, with intensive support to build the educational, vocational, social and independent living skills needed for transition to adulthood.

During this three-week summer experience, students will participate in classes to prepare them for life after high school. Lifelong skills will be developed as they receive coaching from our highly qualified staff in:

  • Preparing for higher education
  • Self-advocacy
  • Navigating a new community
  • Building new relationships
  • Independent living

DC Center for Independent Living
1400 Florida Ave, NE, Suite 3, Washington, DC 20002
202-388-0033 (voice)

The DCCIL is managed by and for persons with a variety of disabilities. The DCCIL is a community based, private non-profit organization that promotes independent life styles for persons with significant disabilities in the District of Columbia. DCCIL has four core independent living services: (1) Independent living skills training including travel training, (2) Peer counseling, (3) Advocacy and legal services, and (4) Information and referral to community services.

DC Developmental Disabilities Council
441 4th Street, NW, 729 North, Washington, DC 20001

The Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) helps to empower individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities by:

  • Educating them about local disability rights laws
  • Creating and supporting inclusive health, education, employment, housing, recreation, childcare, and quality assurance programs
  • Connecting them with other community and governmental organizations that provide disability support services

DC Disability Guide, DC Center for Independent Living, Inc.

This on-line guide offers a wide range of resources from finding personal attendants to accessible restaurants and apartment communities in the DC-MD-VA area.

Department of Housing and Urban Development District of Columbia Field Office
820 1st St, NE, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20002
202-275-9200 (voice) | 202-275-6381 (fax) | 202-275-6388 (TTY)

Housing discrimination based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability is illegal by federal law. If you have been trying to buy or rent a home or apartment and you believe your rights have been violated, you can file a fair housing complaint.

Disability Accommodation Cost Guides

Published by Home Advisor, this article lists the national minimum, average, and maximum costs of various home disability accommodation projects, including:

  • Ramp construction and repair
  • Doorway modification
  • Elevator installation and repair
  • Kitchen and bathroom remodeling

The article also highlights other key considerations associated with each project, such as:

  • Types of materials
  • Specifications
  • And more

Disability.gov

Disability.gov connects people with disabilities, their families, and the organizations that support them to important information about:
  • Disability benefits (guides, programs, applications, etc.)
  • Civil rights (ADA information, accessibility guidelines, employment rights, complaint procedures, etc.)
  • Community life (history of the independent living movement, personal care assistance services, sports and leisure activities, etc.)
  • Education (IDEA and IEP information, teaching materials and strategies, classroom supports, college prep, etc.)
  • Emergency preparedness (inclusive emergency planning, disaster recovery assistance, emergency service accessibility, etc.)
  • Employment (career planning, workforce development, internship programs, hiring and recruiting information, etc.)
  • Health care (disability and condition information, services and providers, caregiving options, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Housing (housing laws, home buying guides, supportive housing options, home modification, etc.)
  • Technology (accessible technology guidelines and standards, assistive information technology, assistive educational technology, financial assistance, etc.)
  • Transportation (laws, travel guides, providers, vehicle modification, safety and complaint procedures, etc.)

District of Columbia Housing Authority
1133 N. Capitol St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-535-1000 (voice)

The District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA) manages subsidized housing programs, with a separate waiting list for each program. These housing programs are: 1) Public Housing, 2) Housing Choice Voucher-Tenant based Vouchers, 3) Housing Choice Voucher-Moderate Rehabilitation, and 4) Project Based Vouchers. Rental assistance is provided to low-income teens, young adults, and families through each housing program, and the assistance is based on household income. For complete details on these housing programs and renting assistance, contact the DCHA office.

ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia (ECNV)
2300 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 305 Courthouse Plaza II, Arlington , VA 22201
703-525-ECNV (3268) (voice) | 703-525-3585 (fax) | 703-525-3553 (TTY)
info@ecnv.org

The Mission of the ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia, Inc. (ECNV) is to empower people with disabilities to live independently.

Our goals are to enable individuals with disabilities to:

  • improve the quality of their lives;
  • determine their own lifestyles;
  • participate in all aspects of society;
  • secure their human and civil rights;
  • exercise self advocacy; and
  • ensure a system for consumer control and policy direction

Entering the World of Work:A Guide to Employment Programs for Adults with Disabilities in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax & Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, covers the following key issues:

  • When to start preparing for entry into the workforce.
  • What you need to know to prepare for and stay on the job.
  • Whether working will affect your child’s benefits.
  • Which steps to take now to protect your loved one’s financial future.
  • How he or she will get around.

Finding a Home for Adults with Disabilities A Guide for Families in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, addresses the following issues:

  • Who qualifies for government housing support.
  • What publicly financed housing is available.
  • How different options work.
  • Whether support services can be integrated with housing.
  • Which steps to take now to protect your loved one’s financial future.

Fire Safety & Disabilities Guide

This improvenet article offers fire safety tips and resources for people who are:

  • blind or have low vision
  • deaf or hard-of-hearing
  • physically disabled
  • cognitively impaired

Fulfilling the American Dream: A Guide for Disabled Homebuyers

This guide is designed to be a tool to assist those fearing their disability may become a factor in making the home buying experience more cumbersome. You will find information on what your rights are, resources to aid you in understanding the procedures involved in acquiring a home, and advice on how to proceed if you feel your rights have been dishonored. Additionally, you will find resources to make the most of the opportunities available to you for purchasing a home, whether your plans are to purchase your first house or to relocate from your current residence to your dream home.

Get Involved DC! Washington, DC
202-338-7158 EXT. 20 (voice)
tjones@inclusionresearch.org

GET INVOLVED DC! is a program that will give people with developmental disabilities the opportunity to become more involved in the DC community through service and recreation. This program will serve young adults for one year with a goal of training them to independently find and attend community service and recreational events. Training will be provided on event planning, budgeting and the use of public transportation (Metro rail and Metro buses) in order to get members to/from community service and recreational activities rather than having participants depend on Metro Access. GET INVOLVED DC! Members will be offered a wide range of volunteer and recreational events and activities, in an integrated setting, that they can choose to participate in. They may also recommend activities that may be of interest to the group that may not be on the list. Washington, DC hosts numerous events during the year such as folk festivals, parades, sporting events, concerts and theatrical presentations. DC also provides many community service opportunities throughout the year including national service days, holidays, charity events and neighborhood cleanups. Members of the program will go to these events independently or with friends in both community service and recreational capacities. The overall goal of this project is to empower youth and young adults with disabilities with the tools they need to access, enjoy and give back to their community.

Girl Scout Council of the Nation's Capital
4301 Connecticut Ave NW, , Washington, DC 20008
202-237-1670 (voice) | 202-274-2161 (fax)

The Girl Scout Council of the Nation's Capital (GSCNC) helps girls to promote diversity, gain practical life skills, and connect with their community through a variety of artistic, educational, and environmental events. Some of these events include:

  • Photography expos
  • College and career conferences
  • Nature workshops

Guide to Moving for the Disabled

This resource guide was created for people with disabilities and designed to provide moving advice that touches on their unique needs when changing residences.

HEATH Resource Center
2134 G Street, N.W., Suite 306 , Washington , DC 20052
AskHEATH@gwu.edu

The HEATH Resource Center gathers and provides information about national, post-secondary education supports for individuals with disabilities. The Center:

  • Participates in national conferences, trainings, and workshops
  • Develops training modules
  • Publishes resource papers, factsheets, guides, directories, and website information on accessibility, accommodations, financial aid, career development, independent living, and rehabilitation
  • Fosters a network of disability professionals

The HEATH Resource Center is managed by George Washington University's Graduate School of Education and Human Development in partnership with the HSC Foundation and the National Youth Transitions Center.

Home Modifications to Promote Independent Living Fact Sheet

This fact sheet from AARP explains home modifications and how they can increase accessibility and safety for older adults so they can stay in their homes. It also addresses common home modifications needed for older adults and how to get assistance to pay for them.

Home Safety for People with Disabilities Guide

Emergencies can happen at a moment's notice. Mobility problems and hearing, learning, or seeing disabilities can add complication. It is important to plan ahead so you are better prepared for any urgent situation. Our booklet Preparing for Disaster for People with Disabilities and other Special Needs gives tips on getting informed, making a plan, assembling a kit, and keeping your plans up to date.

These tips provide people with disabilities and their caregivers with guidance in managing communications, equipment, pets and home hazards. The materials were co-authored by the American Red Cross and Department of Homeland Security and FEMA.

Income Maintenance Administration (IMA)
645 H St, NE, Washington, DC 20002
202-698-3900 (voice)

The mission of the Department of Human Services Income Maintenance Administration (IMA) is to determine the eligibility of applicants and to recertify the eligibility of recipients for federal and District-funded assistance programs, and to help heads of households receiving TANF benefits to become employed and move toward financial independence. IMA determines eligibility for benefits under the Temporary Cash Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medical Assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) (formerly Food Stamps), and Child Care Subsidy, Burial Assistance, Emergency Rental Assistance, and Interim Disability Assistance, Refugee Cash Assistance and  programs. In addition, IMA’s Food Stamp Employment and Training Program (FSET) provide employment and training services to able-bodied adults without dependents who receive food stamps.

Income Maintenance Administration, Anacostia
2100 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Washington, DC
202-645-4614 (voice) | 202-727-3527 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Congress Heights
4001 S. Capitol St, SW, Washington, DC
202-645-4546 (voice) | 202-645-4546 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Fort Davis
3851 Alabama Ave, SE, Washington, DC
202-645-4500 (voice) | 202-645-6205 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, H Street
Income Maintenance Administration, 645 H St, NE, Washington, DC
202-698-4350 (voice) | 202-645-6205 (fax)

Health (insurance)

Income Maintenance Administration, Taylor Street
1207 Taylor St, NW, Washington, DC
202-576-8000 (voice) | 202-576-8740 (fax)

Health (insurance)

The Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center Family-Centered Search Tool

The Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center hosts and links to numerous resources relevant to families across the country at its website. The family-centered search feature allows users to filter resources by topic, format, audience, and grade.

Integrated Living Opportunities
855.344.9771 (voice)
info@specialneedsplanning.net

Integrated Living Opportunities (ILO) is a network of parents of young adults with disabilities, seeking to support each other with the goal of creating full lives for our family members in an integrated and inclusive community.

  • ILO will help you find and create housing for your family member with special needs, help you identify and secure the supports needed for that individual to integrate successfully into the community and live independently, and ensure that the personal circles of support are sustainable while you are alive and after you are gone.
  • ILO will establish lifelong advocacy for your child with special needs, and will continue to advocate for and facilitate personal networks of support for your child after you are gone.
  • ILO will facilitate committees that will create and organize recreational, social and life skills classes in specific areas of community-based housing.
  • ILO will provide its members with the opportunity to attend free workshops in life planning, estate planning, employment, government benefits and other relevant topics to stay abreast of all essential topics in special needs.
  • ILO will help with the budgeting process for acquiring a home. If you are interested in purchasing or renting a home to create community-based housing for your family member with disabilities, ILO can help with this process. In addition to helping families financially plan for this process, ILO will educate families as to how to access financial support for purchasing this home, i.e. mortgage information for individuals with disabilities, housing vouchers, etc. ILO will also provide valuable information on the different programs existing in your area which can help you acquire financing or qualify for different programs. An example of one of these types of programs is the Moderately Priced Dwelling Unit (MPDU) program in Maryland.

Jenny Hatch Justice Project
202-448-1448 (voice)
JHJP@dcqualitytrust.org

Sponsored by Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, The Jenny Hatch Justice Project (JHJP) supports the right of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities to make decisions about their lives. JHJP provides access to:

  • Recent research publications on independent living services and alternatives to guardianship
  • Informative brochures on decision-making
  • A sample training program
  • Legal, educational, and transition resources

Latin American Youth Center
1419 Columbia Road, NW, Washington , DC 20009
202.319.2225 (voice) | 202.462.5696 (fax)

LAYC provides multi-lingual, culturally sensitive programs in the following areas:

Educational Enhancement
  • Standards-based culturally competent year-round tutoring and homework assistance
  • Healthy recreation and fitness
  • Computer literacy classes
  • College preparation
Social Services
  • Counseling
  • Prevention
  • Child placement
  • Residential housing
Workforce Investment
  • Job readiness and life skills training
  • Job placement services
  • Computer instruction
  • Preparation to pass the General Education Development (GED) examination
Community Wellness
  • Promoting health and wellness
  • Building cultural peace
  • Addressing issues of homelessness
Art + Media
  • Fine arts
  • Photography
  • Video
  • Radio
  • Media production
  • Music
  • Creative writing
Advocacy
  • Influencing public policy, practices and social systems that affect low-income and minority youth

Linden Resources
2013 H ST NW, Washington, DC 20006
(202) 542-4441 (voice)
info@linden.org

Linden provides rehabilitative services to people with disabilities that help them get and keep community jobs with a wide variety of small, medium and large businesses, government agencies and within Linden’s own commercial printing and warehousing businesses.

Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute
801 Buchanan St, NE, Washington, DC 20017
202-529-7600 (voice) | 202-529-2028 (fax)

The Kennedy Institute works with teens and young adults with developmental disabilities to provide a broad array of education, therapeutic, employment, and community living programs.

M&L Independent Living Program and Housing Project
1050 Connecticut Avenue, NW 10th Floor , Washington, DC 20036
(202) 248-7113 (voice) | (202) 248-7635 (fax)
maedi@specialneedsplanning.net

M&L Special Needs Planning's Independent Living Program and Housing Project is an online database that contains the current program, eligibility, funding, and contact information for housing/independent living service providers all across the country. The database is available to users through one of four payment plans:

  • Monthly for $9.99
  • Quarterly for $27.49
  • Semi-annual for $49.00
  • Annual for $94.99

Users will have access to:

  • Program, provider, and policy updates
  • Current housing news, articles, studies, and reports
  • Instructional videos
  • Resource links

M&L Special Needs Planning, LLC
1050 Connecticut AVE NW 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 248-7113 (voice)
maedi@specialneedsplanning.net

Comprehensive Special Needs Financial Life Plans -Families retain M&L Special Needs Planning, LLC to create a custom comprehensive special needs financial plan. We conduct a series of meetings in which we identify and prioritize the family's goals and objectives; the goals and objectives of the special needs individual; analyze the present financial situation with respect to both of these goals, review family resources, legal documents, investments, insurance and other related issues. From this information we create a plan with recommendations and steps to maximize and protect family and government resources. If the recommendations are acceptable to the family, we work with the family to implement the recommendatons and set up periodic reviews. In addition to the Comprehensive Special Needs Financial Life Planning we have created a series of workshops to assist in understanding the complexities and nuances of special needs financial planning.

M&L Special Needs Resources Webpage
5603 Potomac Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016
855.344.9771 (voice) | 855.344.9771
info@specialneedsplanning.net

At M&L Special Needs Planning, we feel that access to the right information is the key to planning a successful future. In keeping with our goal to keep you informed, and to provide you with the tools to enable you to plan a happy and successful future for your family, we have compiled a list of special needs resources.

Organizations: This special needs resource link will take you to a list of organizations that are dedicated to providing special needs services to your family and your child with special needs. The list includes organizations from all across the country.

Advocacy: Advocacy is a public process by an individual or group which attempts to influence governmental policy and resource allocations. We have compiled a list of advocacy groups that can help you fight for issues that are pertinent to you and your family.

Government and Social Security: A key aspect of our special needs planning services involves working with governmental agencies in order to access public resources. We have provided you with the websites for a number of agencies that you may need to contact in order to receive information or benefits that are important to your family’s future.

Housing: There are a number of organizations which provide information and services related to housing issues and questions. These special needs resources are excellent starting points for understanding housing services.

Disability: This link will take you to a list of websites which contain a wealth of information related to disability, including the link to disability.gov, a redesigned federal website that connects more than 50 million Americans with disabilities to thousands of resources on disability related issues, programs and services.

Local ARCS: The ARC is the world’s largest community-based organization of and for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This link will take you to the websites of the ARC chapters located in Washington D.C., Maryland, and Virginia. The ARCs are located in every state and are an excellent special needs resource for the family with special needs.

Post-Secondary Options: Many parents of children with special needs worry about what their child will do after high school. We have compiled a list of programs and special needs resources to help you access information and begin to plan for this transition in your child’s life.

Health: This list of websites will help you access information regarding medical insurance, medication control, as well as other health related issues.

Transitioning: The transition from school into adulthood is an essential and often complex step in the life of a person with special needs. These special needs resources will provide you with information and access to service providers who can help you and your child with special needs on his or her transitioning journey.

Employment: This section is geared towards employment resources for adults with special needs. There is a number of organization which compile information on this topic. We will add only the best special needs resources to this category.

Magazines and Articles: We have a gathered a number of really fantastic magazines and articles that can provide you with expert information, other special needs resources, and can provide links to other members of the special needs community.

General Assistance: These resources are designed to help with any overall questions, or to provide general information or help on a wide range of topics.

Children with Special Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special needs, the emotional process of the first diagnosis, and the important of early intervention. Early intervention services for both the Washington D.C. area, and nationwide are provided at the end of the article.

Children with Healthcare Needs: A brief description of what it means to be a child with special healthcare needs, how it can impact the family situation, and statistics regarding children with special healthcare needs from across America. Resources to help you find help in obtaining a diagnosis, healthcare, and support are provided.

Special Education Schools: When it comes to helping children with special needs realize their fullest potential, special education schools are a valuable asset. Follow this link for a brief article outlining exactly why special needs schools are so important, and the ways in which the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 affects the way we educate our children with special needs.

Special Need Trust: A Special Needs Trust is the only legal solution to protect an individual with disabilities to qualify for government benefits. Follow this link for a brief explanation of what the term means and the different types of Special Needs Trusts, as well as other important points to consider when setting up your own Special Needs Trust.

Maryland Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs Resource Locator: In order to improve access to information about needed services and resources, Maryland’s Office for Genetics and People with Special Health Care Needs created the resource database. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) of Maryland created the online resource database for children and youth with special health care needs. In Maryland, over one third of families of these children report that they cannot easily access needed community based services and half of the same families report that they need help finding services for their youngsters. For families in rural areas of the state, it can be even more difficult to find specialty services.

Cerebral Palsy Guide is a website that is intended to give parents of children with cerebral palsy simple, straightforward information about cerebral palsy and its treatment, as well as to help families connect with medical and legal professionals. Designed specifically with parents of children newly diagnosed with CP in mind, the website strives to offer “peace, healing, and happiness.”

The Mason LIFE Program

The Mason LIFE Program is an innovative post-secondary program for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who desire a university experience in a supportive academic environment. The mission of the Mason LIFE Program is a dual purpose. The first is to provide a supportive academic environment for our students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The second is to supply an apprenticeship for George Mason University students..

Medical Transportation Technology's On the Move Program
rbernardy@mtm-inc.net

How do YOU get where you need to go? Learning how to ride public transit provides individuals with disabilities a multitude of benefits: increased independence and confidence, increased opportunities for vocational, educational and social pursuits, and the development of important life-long independent living skills. MTM's On the Move program operates under a contract with Metro to provide intensive and personalized one-on-one travel training services to individuals with disabilities in Washington DC. During travel training activities, our travel trainers work with each individual to increase their travel skills so they can safely and independently ride buses and trains to their chosen destination. For some, travel training may be completed in a short amount of time; for others, it may take longer to learn and be comfortable riding their route independently. We work closely with the individual as well as those involved in their care to ensure that training is comprehensive and satisfactory.

Participating individuals must be eligible for either Metro's Reduced Fare program or MetroAccess. Participation in travel training is free and does not affect an individual's eligibility for MetroAccess.

National Council on Independent Living (NCIL)
2013 H St.,NW, 6th Floor, Washington , DC 20006
202.207.0334 (voice) | 202.207.0341(fax) | 202.207.0340 (TTY)
ncil@ncil.org

NCIL represents thousands of organizations and individuals including: individuals with disabilities, Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Statewide Independent Living Councils (SILCs), and other organizations that advocate for the human and civil rights of people with disabilities throughout the United States.

National Disability Institute (NDI)
1667 K Street, NW Suite 640, Washington, DC 20006
202.296.2040 (voice)

National Disability Institute is most recognized for harnessing the power of collaboration with government, financial institutions, the business community, community nonprofits, and institutions of higher education to advance new opportunities for work, income production, savings, and asset building for people with disabilities.

What We Do
NDI's tools for change include public education, policy development, training and technical assistance activities, and innovation pilots and demonstrations.

Our Core Competencies

  • Tax Preparation
  • Financial Education
  • Asset Development
  • Employment
  • Public Benefits Planning
  • Public Policy

Our Priorities

  • Improve collaboration across federal agencies to advance a better economic future for individuals with disabilities.
  • Align public policy to promote work, saving and asset accumulation.
  • Develop and document pathways to improved economic self-sufficiency for youth and adults with disabilities.
  • Inform, educate and improve financial capability of youth and adults with disabilities.
  • Build and grow the Real Economic Impact Network through marketing and outreach activities and innovative projects.

National Veterans Center (NVC)
2013 H Street NW, Suite 200, Washington , DC 20006
202-652-4742 (voice)
info@nationalveteranscenter.org

Powered by Student Veterans of America and in conjunction with The HSC Foundation, the National Veterans Center’s (NVC) mission is to empower military veterans to reach their full potential. This partnership between non-profit organizations accomplishes its mission by acting as a central conduit that pairs service providers from the public and private sector with veterans and military families seeking resources. The NVC serves as America’s laboratory for developing, testing, and digitally delivering new solutions to veterans in order to assist them with overcoming disability, completing their education, finding meaningful employment, and thriving in their communities.

National Youth Transitions Conference Support Fund

The National Youth Transitions Conference Support Fund is jointly will be used to support youth participation and/or programming at conferences and seminars related to the transition of youth with disabilities from school to work and independent living.

Requests for Support will be received, reviewed, and approved jointly by the staff of HSCF and MEAF. Support is restricted to members of the Youth Transitions Collaborative and priority given to those members that are engaged and active participants of the Collaborative. Organizations that are approved for support agree to acknowledge the funding in all written materials including websites and social mediums by stating, "Jointly funded by The HSC Foundation and the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation through the Youth Transitions Collaborative".

To apply, please submit requests in writing by email to Son Park McBride or Kevin Webb

Indicate in your request:

  • How the funds for the conference/seminar will help young people and young veterans successfully transition to work and independent living,
  • How many people will be impacted by your event, and
  • What recognition HSCF & MEAF will receive.

Requests up to $5,000 in support will be considered, but we encourage you to indicate different levels of support that are available for your event. The National Youth Transitions Conference Support Fund is limited to a total of $20,000 for the 2014 calendar year. Once these funds are expended, HSCF and MEAF will notify Collaborative members that no more requests will be considered.

New View, LLC
966 Hungerford Dr, Suite 7, Rockville, MD 20850
240-535-4036 (voice)
contact@newviewot.com

New View, LLC establishes relationships with children, young adults, adults, and their families and/or educational support team to determine relevant, individualized, and client-centered recommendations related to education, work, self-care, and leisure. We provide quality therapeutic services across the lifespan to create meaningful life experiences that help to improve independence and confidence in education, work, self-care, and leisure activities. We provide occupational therapy treatment and evaluation in addition to vocational, career guidance, and assessment.

New Vision Photography Program, Inc.
680 Rhode Island Ave, NE, Suite H4, Washington, DC 20002
202-269-6723 (voice) | 202-269-6724 (fax)
newvisionphoto@aol.com

Supported employment and long-term follow-along services in the photography industry and community inclusion for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, introducing them to a creative world of digital photography, entrepreneurship programs, and One-Hour Photo Mini Lab training and employment.

The Outcomes Service (The Treatment and Learning Centers, Inc.)
2092 Gaither Road, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850
301.294.9205 (voice)
dezrin@ttlc.org

Provides services that enable adults with brain injury, cognitive impairments, neurological and developmental disabilities to reach the highest levels of productivity, independence and inclusion in the community.

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
5335 Wisconsin AVE NW Suite 825, Washington, DC 20015
(202) 448-1450  (voice)
info@dcqualitytrust.org

Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities is an advocacy organization that is an independent catalyst for change in the lives of people of all ages with developmental disabilities. Quality Trust advocates, monitors, provides legal education, training, and family navigation to residents of the District of Columbia.

RCM of Washington
900 2nd Street, NE, Suite 8, Washington, DC 20002
202-789-1930 (voice)
info@rcmwashington.com

We strive to support each person in a positive and nurturing environment, which integrates all aspects of living, working, and learning, and acknowledges their place as a valued and viable member of the community. RCM has developed an innovative and creative approach to working with people with Intellectual Disabilities through self-determined choices and experiences tailored to individual dreams, desires, and needs. We promote opportunities for building relationships and  integrating into the community.

Riverview School
551 Route 6A East Sandwich, Cape Cod, MA 02537
(508) 888-0489 (voice) | (508) 833-7001 (fax)
admissions@riverviewschool.org

Riverview School, an independent coeducational boarding/day school, provides a caring community for adolescents and young adults with complex language, learning and cognitive disabilities. The School is committed to developing student competence and confidence in academic, social and independent living skills.

Routines and children with disability

This article discusses routines and why they are good for children with disability. It also provides tips for getting the most out of your routines and for helping your child follow them.

Saint John's Community Services
2201 Wisconsin Ave, NW, Suite C-120, Washington, DC 20007
202-274-3460 (voice) | 202-337-5459 (fax)
aginsberg@sjcs.org

The mission of SJCS-DC is "Advancing community supports and opportunities for people living with disabilities". SJCS-DC is predicated on the tenets that all individuals have the inalienable rights and abilities to be viable, participating, economically and socially empowered members of society. To this end the services and operations of SJCS-DC are designed to promote the full community inclusion of individuals with disabilities through a process that is person centered and demonstrates the utmost respect, dignity and value for individuals with disabilities and their families. SJCS-DC seeks to empower individuals with disabilities and their families through the provision of training, information, experiences, and support that further their capabilities and independence. To this end SJCS-DC stresses choices and meaningful decision making by individuals with disabilities throughout service delivery planning and implementation.

Securing a Future for Your Child with a Disability: A Parents Guide to Adult Services in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax and Falls Church

This guide, written by the Arc of Northern Virginia, will help you answer the following questions:

  • Who’s in charge of key life decisions.
  • Whether your adult child is eligible for government support.
  • What kind of jobs and day support programs are available.
  • Which recreational activities are best.
  • How he or she will get around.
  • Where they’ll live.

ServiceSource
6295 Edsall Rd, Suite 175 , Alexandria, VA 22312
703-461-6000 (voice)

ServiceSource is a leading nonprofit disability resource organization with regional offices and programs located in nine states and the District of Columbia. We serve more than 15,700 individuals with disabilities annually through a range of innovative and valued employment, training, rehabilitation, housing and other support services. ServiceSource directly employs more than 1,500 individuals on government and commercial affirmative employment contracts, making us one of the largest employers of people with disabilities nationwide.

Whether you are an individual with a disability, a government contracting officer or a local business owner, ServiceSource is committed to meeting or exceeding your needs and expectations.

The Social Security Administration
1-800-772-1213 (voice)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Anacostia
2041 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave, SE, Suite 130, Washington, DC 20020
202-755-0672 (voice) | 202-673-5168 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, M Street Office
2100 M St, NW, Washington, DC 20037
202-653-5040 (voice) | 202-233-2012 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The Social Security Administration, Postal Plaza (Brentwood)
1905-B 9th St, NE, Washington, DC 20018
202-376-5049 (voice) | 202-755-0630 (fax)

The Social Security Administration is responsible for two major programs that provide benefits or money based on disability: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

Telecommunicating and Accessibility Issues for the Deaf

This webpage offers a series of educative articles, compiled by Five 9 Call Center Software, on hearing impairment and accessibility issues. These articles provide specific information about:

  • The history of telecommunications devices
  • Telephone relay services
  • Using a TTY system
  • Accessing 9-1-1 emergency services
  • Ongoing efforts to improve telecommunication
  • Overcoming isolation through social media
  • Making distance learning courses more inclusive
  • The challenges of communicating in the workplace
  • Accessibility and the Americans with Disabilities Act

This webpage also offers informative resources related to hearing impairment. These resources include:

  • Webpages devoted to deaf culture
  • Reviews of assistive technology products
  • A database of closed-captioned, educational DVDs

Title VIII: Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

This HUD.gov webpage:

  • Summarizes the purpose and history of the The Fair Housing Act
  • Summarizes HUD's role in administering The Fair Housing Act
  • Highlights significant, recent changes made to the Fair Housing Act
  • Provides an overview of the Fair Housing Assistance Program (FHAP)
  • Specifies regulations for HUD employees and contractors

VCare, LLC
8112 Eastern Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20012
(202) 779-5440 (voice)
vcareakiridena@gmail.com

VCare, LLC provides professional and in-home developmental disability training and consulting services in the following areas:

  • Special Education
  • Nursing
  • Transitional Living
  • Employment
  • Recreation

Volunteers of America (Alexandria Headquarters)
1600 Duke Street , Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 341-5000 (voice) | (800) 899-0089 (TF)
info@voa.org

At Volunteers of America, we are more than a nonprofit organization. We are a ministry of service that includes nearly 16,000 paid, professional employees dedicated to helping those in need rebuild their lives and reach their full potential. Through our hundreds of human service programs, including housing and healthcare, Volunteers of America touches the lives of more than 2 million people in over 400 communities in 46 states as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico each year. Since 1896, we have supported and empowered America's most vulnerable groups, including veterans, at-risk youth, the frail elderly, men and women returning from prison, homeless individuals and families, people with disabilities, and those recovering from addictions. Our work touches the mind, body, heart — and ultimately the spirit — of those we serve, integrating our deep compassion with highly effective programs and services.

Those We Serve

  • Children, Youth and Families
  • Homeless People
  • Older Adults
  • People with Behavioral Health Issues
  • People with Disabilities
  • Veterans
  • Formerly Incarcerated

Focus Areas

  • Assistance with Basic Needs
  • Community Outreach and Investment
  • Correctional Re-Entry Services
  • Housing
  • Mental Health
  • Senior Living and Care
  • Substance Abuse

Where Can I Get Help Paying for Home Repairs or Modifications to Make My Home Accessible?

Home modifications may involve converting or adapting your environment so you can live independently. This section of “Disability.gov’s Guide to Housing” lists resources and organizations that will help you get information about making your home accessible.

A Wider Circle
9159 Brookville Road , Silver Spring, MD 20910
301-608-3504 (voice) | 301-608-3508 (fax)
contact@awidercircle.org

A Wider Circle assists individuals and families in transition by providing:

  • Free enrollment in intensive, multi-session job preparedness, financial planning, stress management, nutrition, and parenting
  • Homegoods to formerly homeless families and veterans
  • Emergency response for new mothers, victims of fires or crime
  • Shelter enhancements (e.g., painting and landscaping)
  • Holiday food baskets and toys

Wounded Warrior Project
khensley@woundedwarriorproject.org

Honors and empowers wounded warriors and seeks to raise awareness and enlist the public’s aid for the needs of severely injured service men and women; help severely injured service members aid and assist each other; and provide unique, direct programs and services to meet the needs of severely injured service members. Support of a family caregiver summit to provide a positive sharing and learning experience for attending caregivers, introduce caregivers to members of Congress, to capture demographic data to inform WWP programmatic efforts, and to produce a post-summit white paper to inform key national decision makers on caregiver problems and recommended solutions.

Youth Villages
2020 N. 14th St, Suite 310, Arlington, VA 22201
703-516-6940 (voice) | 703-516-6980 (fax)

Youth Villages helps troubled children and their families by providing intensive in-home services and residential treatment, foster care, adoption, group homes, transitional living, and specialized crisis services.


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